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A Bunch of Random Questions


aquapeanut

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So I've had a bunch of questions just randomly floating around my head for a few days, and I think it's time to find some answers. I wish I could just ask at LFS's, but I know better than to trust anything they say. Here it goes...

1) Is a filter that's cycled in a goldie tank good to be used in any other tank (community, nano, QT, etc.)? For some reason, I have it in my head that a goldie cycled filter can only be used for other goldies. Weird, I know.

2) Is goldfishconnection.com the ONLY place to buy Pro-Gold?

3) How is it that Pro-Gold pellets don't have air in them and don't need to be soaked like other pellets?

4) Why is it okay to have the pond version of Pro-Gold as floating pellets? Aren't my pond comets as likely to swallow air as are fancy goldies?

5) Are black orandas really that hard to find??? I've been shopping around for DAYS and haven't seen a single one!!!

6) Why doesn't my little baby pearlscale eat Repashy Soilent Green as well as my bigger comets do? The comets scarf it down in one bite, but the lil pearlscale just nibbles at it. I tried feeding him/her lil tiny bite-sized pieces but s/he just loses them and they end up all over the tank, so now I just leave it stuck to a plastic fork and let him/her nibble on it until it's gone.

I feel like there are a couple more questions I've been wondering about, but I can't remember them at the moment. Thanks for your input!

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1. Yes providing your goldies aren't sick.

2. Yes.

3. Its still a good idea to soak pro gold especially if you have a floaty fish. Pellets expand.

4. I'm not positive what the difference is. I assume they float so it's easier for pond fish to find.

5. Black is the most unstable color so yes they are harder to find. If you are willing to spend extra money on fish dandy orandas usually has solid black orandas.

6. Smaller fish pick at their food, its normal :)

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So I've had a bunch of questions just randomly floating around my head for a few days, and I think it's time to find some answers. I wish I could just ask at LFS's, but I know better than to trust anything they say. Here it goes...

1) Is a filter that's cycled in a goldie tank good to be used in any other tank (community, nano, QT, etc.)? For some reason, I have it in my head that a goldie cycled filter can only be used for other goldies. Weird, I know.

Yes, you should be able to use in any other freshwater tank with similar or lower bio-loads. If the bio-load is higher, it might tank the cycle a little bit to catch up.

2) Is goldfishconnection.com the ONLY place to buy Pro-Gold?

Yes, it is a proprietary product.

3) How is it that Pro-Gold pellets don't have air in them and don't need to be soaked like other pellets?

I'm not sure where you get this info, but some people still soak their Pro-Gold. What I have noticed is that Pro-Gold is pretty soft as far as pellets go, so you only need to soak the pellets for about 15 seconds or so. More and you'll make a mess.

4) Why is it okay to have the pond version of Pro-Gold as floating pellets? Aren't my pond comets as likely to swallow air as are fancy goldies?

Great question! Single tails are much less likely have floaty issues, although some do. Also, the other foods that they eat in the pond make up the bulk of what they eat, and so in total, they are less prone to problems due to swallowing air.

5) Are black orandas really that hard to find??? I've been shopping around for DAYS and haven't seen a single one!!!

They can be, although this will vary from region to to region. It's taken me 4 years to get a black oranda, and he's not quite jet black, either.

6) Why doesn't my little baby pearlscale eat Repashy Soilent Green as well as my bigger comets do? The comets scarf it down in one bite, but the lil pearlscale just nibbles at it. I tried feeding him/her lil tiny bite-sized pieces but s/he just loses them and they end up all over the tank, so now I just leave it stuck to a plastic fork and let him/her nibble on it until it's gone.

Perhaps because she is small, and more importantly, different fish have different eating habits/styles. My ryukins are pigs and will gulp down a huge piece, while my calico oranda is much more of a nibbler.

I feel like there are a couple more questions I've been wondering about, but I can't remember them at the moment. Thanks for your input!

Ask when you remember. :)

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thanks for all the info! i feel better now :) here's another question:

how in the world am i supposed to feed peas to my fish (pearlie and tropical) with teensy weensy mouths?? the big comets just eat them whole, but everyone else doesn't stand a chance. it'd be like me trying to eat a bowling ball. i mashed some up, but it just made a big mess that went all over the tanks.

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You can feed them separately in a colander floating in your tank or in a separate bowl. Hand feeding or training each fish to eat at separate sides of the tank can help with food competition as well.

Peas that are too large, are to be cut into little pieces after being cooked and shelled. I pinch off little pieces with my fingernail as I drop it into the tank. I'm sure you could use something more high tech like a knife though but once they are cooked and shelled, peas are pretty malleable.

Hope this helps :)

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When my fish were teeny tiny (and for my betta), I cut them into 1/8ths, or was it 1/16ths? I don't know but I just kept cutting and cutting til I couldn't cut no more! :rofl

Now I feed them Repashy gel food and it's much easier!

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I *think* that another reason for floating pellets in ponds is that in a pond environment you may not be able to see your fish as well/as often as in an aquarium, so floating pellets allow you to see that the fish are actually eating and they bring the fish to the surface where you can check them out and keep an eye out for potential issues potential issues.

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tithra: good point, plus it'd be fun feeding the fish and watching them swim to the top! :)

does feeding them repashy do away with feeding fresh veggies like peas? i feed mine repashy now, but since bobby's (the pearlscale) poop still isn't short and is instead LONG and trailing behind him, i figured maybe peas would help. but his mouth is so small and he's so bad at catching food.

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Your comets are fine eating floating pellets because they are just a color variation of the Prussian carp with longer fins. Being a natural fish swallowing air doesn't cause them problems like it does with the fancy goldfish. All fancy goldfish are grossly deformed Prussian carp (Carassius auratus). The Prussian carp were selectively bred to give us all the fancy goldfish varieties we have today.

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Your comets are fine eating floating pellets because they are just a color variation of the Prussian carp with longer fins. Being a natural fish swallowing air doesn't cause them problems like it does with the fancy goldfish. All fancy goldfish are grossly deformed Prussian carp (Carassius auratus). The Prussian carp were selectively bred to give us all the fancy goldfish varieties we have today.

Define natural versus unnatural, please.

Also, isn't it a bit much to say that ALL fancy goldfish are grossly deformed? Let's try to avoid hyperboles, shall we?

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Tithra is right on the button with the inability to see what's happening in the pond. Sinking pellets that aren't grabbed at the surface go straight to the bottom and you can't see whether they've been eaten or not. Feeding pond fish is so much fun that a beginner can easily overfeed with sinking pellets.

It's also hard to hand feed sinking pellets in the pond.

Alex also has a good point that the natural food keeps the digestive tract in such good shape that swallowing a little air isn't likely to be a problem for any pond goldfish, fancy or not.

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