Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
mffeola

Relay of things I have learned.

Recommended Posts

Okay, So I thought I would write this post about the things I have learned about keeping goldfish (necessities and what not) so that you guys would let me know if I know everything I need to or if I may have some misinformation. (This is all for Fancy Goldfish) (Orandas specifically)

  • At least 29 gallons for the first fish and 10 additional gallon for every other.
  • Smaller fish won't mind a taller tank as long as there is additional oxygen being added by a bubbler but larger fish will need more swimming space in a longer tank.
  • Filtration must be 10x the tank size for adequate water movement.
  • Activated Carbon is not required or recommended for filters since beneficial bacteria will remove ammonia and other harmful toxins besides chlorine and other heavy metals which should be removed by a water clarifier.
  • Gravel is not recommended because harmful bacteria may build up in it and Goldies like to play with gravel and may choke.
  • River stones are a good alternative to gravel if you do not want a bare bottom tank
  • Live plants remove waste from water but will be eaten by fish
  • An adequate diet involves flakes, pellets, fresh veggies, and a variety of other types of foods
  • A UV sterilizer will add extra protection to the tank (toxin-wise) but may kill beneficial bacteria???
  • Florescent lighting is the best type for fish since it emits more colors. Better for scales?

I believe that is pretty much the gist. I do have a few questions though.

Are melafix or pimafix effective at curing fish bladder disease? If not: what are they good for? What is a good and inexpensive way to cure fish bladder disease? How do fish get it?

Also, can plants survive without CO2?

I've seen people put their fish: is this okay as long as your hands are clean?

What types of decorations do Fancy Goldfish like? I know some can harm their scales.

Is a heater a good or bad idea? I've heard a lot from both sides. /:

Thanks for reading. :please respond. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great job doing research before getting your fish, it really is the best way to get started. :)

Regarding tank size, I think 15 - 20 gallons per fancy goldfish is a great guideline. For Orandas, I would really go with the 20 gallons per fish rule since they can get very large and will need a lot of swimming room. Longer tanks are better in general, since they have better gas exchange and more swimming room. Taller tanks can still be used with great results though, the longer shaped tanks are just more "ideal".

Filtration should be at least 10x the tank's volume per hour, but can be a little less (7x or more) if you are using a canister filter. I use a combination of HOB and Canister on my tank and really like it. You are correct that carbon is not needed, since it mostly just polishes the water and removes smells and certain compounds. If you are doing proper waterchanges, which should be at least 50% per week or more, your water should stay very clean and "polished" on it's own. Carbon also cannot be used with any live plants since it removes important compounds the plants need for nutrition and health. You are much better off adding some extra biological media such as ceramic rings in place of carbon.

I would pick up some Seachem Prime to use for your water conditioner, since it detoxifies ammonia and nitrite in addition to removing chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals. It's great to use if you have a cycle bump, or in quarentine where you want to protect your fish for any toxins that can build up since a double dose will protect your fish for 24 - 48 hours. It's very handy to have around. I also use Seachem Gold Buffer, since my KH/GH is low and I wasn't getting the results I wanted with cushed coral. You will want to test your PH, KH, and GH in both your tank and out of your tap to see if you will need a buffer as well.

Gravel and sand are both used by many members here with great results, so they are both an option as long as you don't use too much. About 1/4 to 1/2 inch max can be used. I personally have a barebottom tank with some river rocks and absolutely love it, so it's just personal preference. I also have different varieties of Anubias in my tank with my goldfish and they do not eat them, it just depends on what kinds of plants you use. Also, plants do not require CO2 especially low light plants like Java Fern and Anubias. They will do just fine with low - medium lighting and an occasional dose of Seachem Flourish fertilizer. For decorations, I use live plants along with round, smooth river rocks in different sizes and place them around the tank for a natural look. I also painted the bottom of my tank a natural brown/grey color and the back a cream color to give it some visual appeal since my decor is very simple. There are a lot of options, you just want to make sure everything is smooth so the fish cannot injure themselves, and big enough so they cannot choke.

I feed my fish a variety of Pro-Gold pellets, Repashy Soilent Green, and Hikari frozen bloodworms. I also recently purchased some of Goldfish Connection's Shrimp Pellets to try out as a treat for my guys for some additional variety and have been thinking of trying Repashy Spawn and Grow as well. With goldfish diet, variety is key and you want to make sure they are getting a lot of greens along with small amounts of protein throughout the day in small meals as they would in the wild.

A UV sterilzer is great as long as it is 25 watts, which is strong enough to kill free swimming parasites and harmful organisms. Any less and it will just clarify the water by killing any suspended algae. Both can be helpful but are not necessary.

Regarding lighting, any kind of light can be used and as long as it is light during the day and dark at night, the fish will be happy. I personally use LED lights on my tank and have been very happy with them, they grow my plants well and give off a very pretty natural light.

I currently do not use a heater, however I do have one and will use it if my tank begins to sit below 70 degrees throughout the day. I believe that slight temperature changes are perfectly normal and natural, as long as they aren't drastic. Goldfish thrive the most in an outdoor pond, where temperatures change with the seasons and warm and cool with day and night so it's ok if the tank isn't the exact same temperature all day long. You just want to make sure it doesn't change more than a few degrees, and it is best for fancy goldfish if the water stays around 70 degrees since that is best for the beneficial bacteria to function properly and it is best for the metabolism of the fish.

Regarding swim bladder disease, this can be a result of a few different things. Diet plays a big role and if you are making sure to not overfeed and giving enough greens you are not likely to have a lot of issues. Treatment is usually just fasting and diet changes, however there are times where there may be a bacterial infection or internal parasite playing a role where medication may be needed. Some fish are also very sensitive to water quality, so keeping ammonia and nitrite at zero and nitrate as low as possible (under 20ppm at the very least) can help a lot. This isn't very hard to do if you stock properly and do frequent large water changes. Warmer water has also been noted to help with swim bladder issues.

I do not handle my fish unless they are being moved, which is not very often. I leave them in their tank during water changes and they only need to come out when I weigh them ever few months to track their growth. Always make sure your hands are clean and well rinsed before picking them up, and it is best to do so in a very gentle "scoop" type of movement. I also put a tiny bit of Seachem Stress Guard on my hands before picking them up to help protect their slime coat. Picking up with your hands is better than using a net which can damage their fins and slime coat, but only do it when it is needed as it is still possible to harm them.

I think this covers all of your questions, let me know if I missed anything and hopefully others chime in with their opinions as well. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


    • At least 29 gallons for the first fish and 10 additional gallon for every other.
    • Usually it depends on the fish. We actually say 20 for the first and 10 for each extra, or 15 per fish
    • Smaller fish won't mind a taller tank as long as there is additional oxygen being added by a bubbler but larger fish will need more swimming space in a longer tank.
    • Yes, usually, but smaller fish also prefer longer rather than tall, especially for developing swim bladders
    • Filtration must be 10x the tank size for adequate water movement.
    • Yes, for most HOB filters. I actually have more than that on my 55 currently, I get 700 GPH
    • Activated Carbon is not required or recommended for filters since beneficial bacteria will remove ammonia and other harmful toxins besides chlorine and other heavy metals which should be removed by a water clarifier.
    • Correct
    • Gravel is not recommended because harmful bacteria may build up in it and Goldies like to play with gravel and may choke.
    • Yes
    • River stones are a good alternative to gravel if you do not want a bare bottom tank
    • As long as they are large enough
    • Live plants remove waste from water but will be eaten by fish
    • They do not remove waste and not all plants will be eaten by fish. Some plants will suck nitrates. Some plants are more hardy. Usually anubias and java fern hold up against goldfish
    • An adequate diet involves flakes, pellets, fresh veggies, and a variety of other types of foods
    • An adequate diet involves high quality food. Flakes are not necessary if you have access to good pellets. There are some foods that shouldn't be fed to a fish, so always make sure what you are feeding is ok.
    • A UV sterilizer will add extra protection to the tank (toxin-wise) but may kill beneficial bacteria???
    • I don't think it kills BB's. Many people have UV's in their tanks which is usually for getting rid of algae. I am sure someone who uses one will clarify.
    • Florescent lighting is the best type for fish since it emits more colors. Better for scales?
    • They do not necessarily need lighting. I am pretty sure coloration depends on the UV's. The sun affects the levels of melanin pigmentation in your skin, so it would make sense that it is either the UV A or UV B rays, or both, that would have an effect on color, not the colors emitted (or they could correlate with the UV's and have the effect you mentioned, otherwise I am just not sure about this one)

    [*]Are melafix or pimafix effective at curing fish bladder disease? If not: what are they good for? What is a good and inexpensive way to cure fish bladder disease? How do fish get it?

    [*]There is no 'cure' for swim bladder disease. There are only preventatives. Swim bladder can come from many things, illnesses, diet, shape (rounder fish with shorter bodies are prone to it) as well as water level and pressure. It all really depends. We can take the best care of our fish but still have it happen. I don't know much about the subject, so hopefully someone will clarify.

    [*]Also, can plants survive without CO2?

    [*]Some can survive without the extra setup. Research the plant before getting it. Some plants have different requirements. A lot of the more colorful plants need more complicated setups to keep color. The safest choices are anubias and java fern. I also have crypts and cardamine without a CO2 system. Fish naturally produce it so no plant ever really goes without CO2.

    [*]I've seen people put their fish: is this okay as long as your hands are clean?

    [*]You shouldn't 'pet' your fish. Some people will touch them so they get used to being held, but stroking will damage their slime coat.

    What types of decorations do Fancy Goldfish like? I know some can harm their scales.

    [*]The best types of decorations are open and allow water movement through them. Decorations that need to be filled with water to sink are not ok. They can cause bad bacteria to build up and cause a lot of illnesses. Stay away from anything sharp. You don't really need decorations for your fish though. They like plants and driftwood, which are safer as long as they are sterilized properly.

    [*]Is a heater a good or bad idea? I've heard a lot from both sides. /:

A heater is a good thing to have on hand when dealing with a sick fish. Goldfish can tolerate really cold temperatures, but if the temperature outside dips really low, it is a good idea to have a heater. Here, it gets into the 30's-40's at night, so I run a heater to keep the water around 70. Warmer water will help with digestion too. Generally, you want to have the water at 65-75 degrees to keep them active and 'happy'.

There may be some things I said that are incorrect, but I answered to what I understand (: I definitely don't know everything but those should be pretty accurate.

Edited by LovelyChaos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much Ms. Jenny and LovelyChaos. You have been more than helpful! :thumbup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...