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larryngu

Can proper goldfish keeping be done on a budget?

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Can proper goldfish keeping be on done on a budget?

I would say no.

Goldfish keeping done properly is expensive.

There are some things you can "get around" by buying a cheaper alternative but most things you really cant.

What do you think?

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I think it can. The difference is if you are rushing or not, or how many fish you are keeping. Keeping many fish naturally makes it more expensive.

The main expenses in fish keeping is the tank, stand, filters, heaters. But these can be found very cheap, used. You just have to keep looking.

The fish themselves aren't very expensive, unless you insist on paying hundreds on "show quality" fish when you can buy adorable little guys at your LFS for just a few $$.

Food really isn't expensive either. Even Repashy isn't that expensive, when you think that out of an 8oz package you probably get almost 2lbs of gel food, which last long if you don't have a ton of fish.

Medicine and medicated food isn't too bad either. It's normally not that you constantly need to buy any. If you spend $ 25/year on medicine, that is $ 2 per month. Really no big deal.

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I agree it is a very expensive hobby, (I'm thinking of your prior post now, I think it was you lol and I don't know what else to call it)

Even if you go as bare bones as you can the meds, food and maintenance add up. Then sometimes you have to add more equipment like I did if you have water quality issues or need to age your water etc. I feel like every week practically I'm over at Petsmart buying more supplies or ordering stuff I can't get there from Amazon. Not to mention if you qt then you usually have to buy duplicate supplies so as not to cross contaminate your tanks.

Or if you start out super un-educated and buy a tank too small you end up with extras and that money kind of down the drain. I not only have an extra 10g, which might come in handy down the road, but an extra 20g and a stand that goes with it.

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For the last four/five years I have been on a budget, so I think it can be done. I upgraded my tank and got a canister filter both second hand from a fellow kokonut, I got a great deal!!! :) I think deals are out there you just have to keep your eyes open!

Things have become much easier for me as I recentely sold my flat (now we only have the house to worry about!) I love being able to buy treats for the fish and upgrade their equipment from time to time! So I agree that having money makes it easier.

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As with keeping any pet, you do have to put in some amount of money.

Having said that, I don't think keeping goldfish is expensive. There are expenditures, but I think a lot of people get stuck on the mind frame that keeping goldfish should only be getting the fish, throw it in the tank, get a bottle of food that lasts for 5 years, and that's it.

When it comes down to it, you need filter media, Prime, food, and some meds for the fish. For the 14+ fish that I have, this means spending about $150/year, not including costs of electricity etc. That's about $10/fish, or about $1/month for each fish. That's less than a cup of coffee.

In contrast, Dash's food costs about $75/month. His preventative meds are about $15/month. He goes to the vet twice yearly, at about $150 each time. That amounts to about $1500/year for bare essentials, or about 150 times more than the cost of keeping a single goldfish.

Given the numerous studies that show how keeping fish is actually healthy for you, because it reduces stress among other things, that's very little money well spent.

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Startup is expensive, but keeping them isn't so much. I think Alex has a wonderful explanation there.

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I think it can. The difference is if you are rushing or not, or how many fish you are keeping. Keeping many fish naturally makes it more expensive.

The main expenses in fish keeping is the tank, stand, filters, heaters. But these can be found very cheap, used. You just have to keep looking.

The fish themselves aren't very expensive, unless you insist on paying hundreds on "show quality" fish when you can buy adorable little guys at your LFS for just a few $$.

Food really isn't expensive either. Even Repashy isn't that expensive, when you think that out of an 8oz package you probably get almost 2lbs of gel food, which last long if you don't have a ton of fish.

Medicine and medicated food isn't too bad either. It's normally not that you constantly need to buy any. If you spend $ 25/year on medicine, that is $ 2 per month. Really no big deal.

I strongly agree on this.

It will only depend on how many fish you want to keep and according to it the necessary expenses can be done.

For example, a single fancy goldfish will not be expensive.

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I agree with goldenspoiledrotten. Startup is and was expensive for me. Only being six months into fishkeeping I have spent hundreddddsssssss of dollars. The initial setup is done and my daughter and I are so very very happy with everything. We upgraded on the tank and food. Life for the fish is sweet. :goldfish: I still need to get the meds for the fish if one or more should get sick. (no, no, no, don't get sick) And I know down the road I will need to get a bigger QT as the fish get bigger. And a heater. (the list still goes on for me) Okay, I think that will be it.

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I do it! I qualify for food stamps, but I am able to prioritize my animals, fish and cats alike. I have all the brand name stuff for my fish. I get Seachem products, I have brand name prazi, good filters, good water changer, and a great store to help me out. I am good with spending money and saving money, and none of my animals have suffered from 'improper' care. I have only had one death, and that was a baby oranda who came to me sick already. When you know how to spend and find great deals it isn't hard to do the proper upkeep. My start up was only around 70 dollars or so, because I got really lucky with my filters and tank, and found awesome deals, which in turn helped me afford great stuff for my fish. I do the same for my cats and myself as well. But, I am the type of person who puts 120% into my animals, they are my priorities. Some people find it hard to budget money, that I understand, but there are ways to make it work, even while making minimum wage (:

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You can spend as much as you want really, just like with any pet. Start up can be expensive, especially if you don't know what you are doing. That's why it's so crucial to do research before you start. And you can save up for the tank, stand, and other equipment before you are actually to committed to the keeping the fish. Once the fish are in your house, you are stuck. If you do everything right to start with and set up some kind of budget, I think it doesn't have to be expensive.

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Ok, I have to admit that wasn't in the position to really answer this question.

I've only been keeping goldfish "properly" for around a month..

You can disregard this amateur two cents. :oops:

Edited by larryngu

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I think overall goldfish keeping isn't really expensive, if you just have the basic necessities. It's all the extras that burn a hole in your wallet :P

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I can honestly say that I have spent less than $100 on my goldfish this year. That includes 4lbs of food and a lit of prime. I think once you make the initial investment, it isn't really that expensive. But I will admit that I don't pay the water bill so I have no idea as to how much that is costing me.

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I would say it absolutely can be done! Obviously there are initial costs for the set up but luckily for us if you check yard sales, Craigslist, or ask friends/family you'll find there are a lot of people who got bored of fish keeping and want the stuff out of their basements. Food/chemicals/medicine/etc usually last for a long time and there's things like plants and upgrades that you can wait a bit to save up money for. Unexpected costs such as a new filter when yours randomly breaks are obnoxious but as far as random pet costs go, the "emergencies" of goldfish are usually much cheaper than emergency vet visits, expensive medical procedures, or frequent cat/dog meds.

As others have said any pet takes some amount of money but as far as a lot of common pets and hobbies go, goldfish aren't too bad.

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I think starting up and major upgrades are always going to cost some money, I personally enjoy spending money on my fish especially when I have a bit of extra cash because it is something I enjoy buying things for, like shopping for clothes or camera equipment. But being a college student I don't always have money to spare so I do have to watch what I buy, in the end you just have to be smart with your money and where and what it goes to. After you meet the needs of your fish then you can worry about aesthetics and plants.

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It's probably more expensive than most "average" people think. When you tell someone you have GF, I'm sure many of them think of a feeder fish in a GF bowl. I'd bet all of us have opened many people's eyes as far as GF keeping is concerned.

Compared to my dog, my GF are a drop in the bucket :rofl even when compared to when I had my 90 gallon with canister, 2 HOBs, custom made stand, light, UV, etc.

It's all relative, I guess. I bet my dog is a drop in the bucket compared to what all of you horse owners spend . . . .

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Sure you can. Make a pond from a second-hand stock tank. Build a DIY filter. Get a pump at Harbor freight. You can have hundreds of gallons for under $200 -- way under if you are lucky. Once it's set up, your expenses are dechlor and fish food.

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like everyone said, setup is the most costly part of the whole thing. If someone can't afford proper initial setup, then they probably should wait until they have the means for a pet.

But, after setup necessary costs are really minimal when compared to other pets. That said, you can also make it a really expensive hobby if you want to by buying expensive fish, upgrading tanks, adding equipment, aquascaping and supplies etc. It's really one of those things where you can keep it minimal or go all out.

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Too funny, I am the only one who said it was expensive lol

All I know is I bet if I added it all up for all the start-up, including wrong equipment and decorations I am positive I have spent at least $1,000 on this little adventure.

That said, now that its all been spent I shouldn't be spending much going forward (I think) :D;)

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Too funny, I am the only one who said it was expensive lol

All I know is I bet if I added it all up for all the start-up, including wrong equipment and decorations I am positive I have spent at least $1,000 on this little adventure.

That said, now that its all been spent I shouldn't be spending much going forward (I think) :D;)

I definitely agree that initial setup can be expensive, particularly if you buy equipment new. Plus there's lots of things you don't know as a noob, so you often end up spending more than you have to because you buy the wrong equipment etc. In the beginning, I spent money on a 10 gallon kit, gravel, hollow ornaments etc. Found out these were no good, bought a used tank... it leaked, tried to reseal but was not very good at it :P upgraded to a new 30 gallon, had to buy a new light for that etc. Then my fish were too big for the 30 gallon, upgraded to a 40 gallon, had to buy a new stand, new light etc. etc. Had I known what I was getting myself into initially, I would have gone for the 40 gallon straight off and avoided all the other purchases.

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I saw some members suggested that buying used equipment can be an option.

I checked in tank and equipment and not too much on the subject of buying used.

So I started a thread " Share any knowledge you have on buying equipment and tank".

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/104280-share-any-knowledge-you-have-on-buying-used-tank-and-equipment/

Please share your insight.

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I know of all the fish I have had goldfish expense is pretty close to SW tank expense. They are just as hard to keep too. All pets require money to take care of if you want to treat them right and with respect. :twocents

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I saw some members suggested that buying used equipment can be an option.

I checked in tank and equipment and not too much on the subject of buying used.

So I started a thread " Share any knowledge you have on buying equipment and tank".

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/104280-share-any-knowledge-you-have-on-buying-used-tank-and-equipment/

Please share your insight.

Sure if you find some good deals then yea go for it. But make sure it works, make sure it doesnt leak.

Also look for sales like when Petco has there $ sale going on. I also keep parts off of filters that have died on me, so I can use them as replacements for other filters.

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I have spent a lot on my fish, but I don't think someone has to. The key is knowledge -- if I were doing it again, it wouldn't cost nearly as much.

I see great deals on used tanks all the time, in all shapes and sizes. The basic 29 or 30 and 55s are very common, and I could get any number of these around here, cheap with everything included. That plus one more hob filter isn't so much. Then food (I use Omega One) and Prime and basic fish from any store -- boom, that's a tank, and that doesn't cost much. A person could even get some nice anubias and stick them on rocks from the yard for just a little money. And barebottom is free, but if you want substrate, multipurpose sand from the hardware store is $5 for a huge bag. I feed store-brand frozen peas and other veggies at minimal cost. My qt is a plastic tub that I already had. :)

But I didn't know that it could be so simple, so I spent a boatload on junk that I didn't need. Plus, I couldn't settle on a tank until I found just the right one. Even though it took awhile to find the right setup for me, it's hard to look back and say, "Gee, if only I had gotten the $500 tank at first." Like that would have happened. :blink: No, it was something I had to work up to.

But next time, I'll know just what to do. ;)

Edited by ShawneeRiver

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Too funny, I am the only one who said it was expensive lol

All I know is I bet if I added it all up for all the start-up, including wrong equipment and decorations I am positive I have spent at least $1,000 on this little adventure.

That said, now that its all been spent I shouldn't be spending much going forward (I think) :D;)

I definitely agree that initial setup can be expensive, particularly if you buy equipment new. Plus there's lots of things you don't know as a noob, so you often end up spending more than you have to because you buy the wrong equipment etc. In the beginning, I spent money on a 10 gallon kit, gravel, hollow ornaments etc. Found out these were no good, bought a used tank... it leaked, tried to reseal but was not very good at it :P upgraded to a new 30 gallon, had to buy a new light for that etc. Then my fish were too big for the 30 gallon, upgraded to a 40 gallon, had to buy a new stand, new light etc. etc. Had I known what I was getting myself into initially, I would have gone for the 40 gallon straight off and avoided all the other purchases.

My thoughts exactly :exactly

I made all those same mistakes!

What was funny was a 40 looked absolutely HUGE and I thought NO WAY would I ever need a tank that big. Here I am after our 10, then our 20 and now of course the 40.

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