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Need some plant opinions....


MexiMike83

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So here's the list.

Medium Malaysian driftwood covered in Riccia Fluitans or the Medium Malaysian driftwood covered in Marimo ball, moss ball

Hygrophila corymbosa

Lilaeopsis mauritiana, MICRO SWORD

I'm aware that anubias, and onion plant species work. I'm just interested in finding out if any of the above are goldfish safe or grow fast enough to keep up with the little Pac-women :rofl Are there any grasses that do ok?

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I know that some people are able to keep driftwood in their goldfish tanks, but it was ultimately an unmitigated disaster for me, from things growing on it, stuff accumulating under it, and fish getting stuck or getting their fins ripped on it. :(

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I know that some people are able to keep driftwood in their goldfish tanks, but it was ultimately an unmitigated disaster for me, from things growing on it, stuff accumulating under it, and fish getting stuck or getting their fins ripped on it. :(

That is definitely worth taking into consideration. What started growing on your driftwood, were there plants already growing on them like they have at the planted aquarium central?

My girlfriend and I are interesting in trying to do some aqua-scaping in the aquarium. The problem is fitting the plants that fit the niche: low-medium light, either hardy or grow fast to compete with munching, and plants that can tolerate the temp as well as hard water. If I can only get one more goldie later on, then I will take a page out of Jess's book and start playing with plants :) My main concerns are putting something in there that could be toxic to them - I don't mind experimenting a little with "might work" plants, but I don't want to do anything that will jeopardize my Orandas.

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I think they are supposed to harmless fungi that grew on the wood, but they definitely made me nervous, because they were not part of the plan.

Have you thought about hardscaping with rocks and certain types of low light plants? I'll see if I can whip up some YouTube examples for you. :)

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I think they are supposed to harmless fungi that grew on the wood, but they definitely made me nervous, because they were not part of the plan.

Have you thought about hardscaping with rocks and certain types of low light plants? I'll see if I can whip up some YouTube examples for you. :)

That's kindof what we're doing now. We have a black lava rock in there with an anubias attached to it to add to the illusion of a planted tank with the Tahitian moon sand substrate. I've heard of folks tying plants to...grated plastic (for lack of a better description), this way I could hide it under the sand. I am definitely open to suggestions.

Edit: I would be interested in hardscaping if the plants don't work out. I like the idea of a more complete ecosystem in the tank. If everything is running great, bacteria, plants etc., my hypothesis is it should act as an extra barrier to bad stuff. Similarly, the bacteria growing in your gut if kept healthy, can act as an extra line of defense against pathogens. So ya, that's kinda what I want to do in the near future.

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Oh and that white fungus stuff!? I had that stuff too on a so-called "mopani log." I would think that if the plants, or moss are growing on the log that the fungus wouldn't be able to establish itself. But again, I'm open to suggestions. At this point, I'm outside looking through the glass so to speak. I have no idea what to expect.

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I'm wary of driftwood as well, and am not a big fan simply because of the potential risk it poses. I took mine out of the tank after about 2 months due to physical injury and the slime that kept growing on it ;) but I know others here have had success keeping it in their tanks safely, so it's certainly possible,

For plants, I hated my micro sword and I think you will have a hard time keeping it with Goldies. It was really slow to root and spread in my betta tank even with high lighting. If youre looking for a ground cover type plant I would personally try dwarf sag... It's possible they'll nibble it of they're inclined, but it's a fast grower/spreader and doesn't have a lot of requirements. Along the same lines, Val is always am easy fast growing pretty plant, particularly the spiral Val is really nice looking... Again Goldies may possibly nibble this. Jungle Val is a bit thicker/tougher if you think they might use it as a salad bar.

Amazon swords, crypts (retrospiralis is my personal favorite), and java fern are alway low maintenance good goldfish tank choices. Water sprite and wisteria are also pretty fast growing plants, but have slightly more chance of becoming salad since their leaves ate delicate :)

Hope this helps some :) I can't wait to see what you decide

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Val is by far my favourite plant since it is easy growing and looks very nice- you can literally make a wall of val if you wish to :P

I have kept cardamine as well as baby tears in my goldfish tanks, and both grew quite well and will do fine :) Cardamine is supposed to be a medium to high light plant, and does a lot better floating. I kept my cardamine plant in a shady area (not on purpose) and it is still growing quite well and has been for over a month now :)

If you're interested in moss, willow moss is a very quick growing plant and is not fussy at all about lighting and temperature.

The only issue is that if you wish to plant plants into pots of gravel, be sure to rinse out the gravel every couple of weeks under warm water to remove any waste build ups that may have accumulated, as well as give the surface a quick siphoning every WC just to be sure :)

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Ok, and another question. How do you balance the CO2 needed for the plants during the day and the O2 consumption at night (including the fish)? Do you run CO2 in the tank by day and an oxygen bubble at night? Or is the surface agitation from the filters enough O's for the plants and the fish?

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Ok, and another question. How do you balance the CO2 needed for the plants during the day and the O2 consumption at night (including the fish)? Do you run CO2 in the tank by day and an oxygen bubble at night? Or is the surface agitation from the filters enough O's for the plants and the fish?

There is only one person I know on the forum who actually runs CO2 in their goldfish tanks. Everyone else has left it alone...

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I would not use the hygro in a goldfish tank. I got a couple in my community tank and I can imagine the goldfish munching on the tender leaves of this plant.

If your fish usually don't go after live plants, then that's a different story. The giant hygro is a great nitrate buster, fast growing even in low light and you can produce more plants by clipping the existing ones. This will actually also make the plant bushier, because it usually grows two new "branches" out where one top was clipped off, doubling the volume of new growth.

I think the thing with driftwood is that it makes a big difference if you have some sort of pleco in the tank or not. Since the pleco constantly grazes on the wood, actually eating it veeery slowly, it is unlikely for the wood to grow stuff on it when there is a pleco. Without pleco, the wood can get a slimy buildup.

If you have no pleco with the goldfish, I personally would not use wood. I too had a goldfish getting herself wedged in underneath the wood and unable to get back out on her own.

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Without high lighting, you wouldn't need co2 for your tank. With low lighting, you'll want to stick with easy plants.

Are you planning a substrate? Which one?

I like my driftwood, but I have nerites who keep it clean and slime free. It was slimy at first, but the nerites took care of that. I've had it for 8-9 months now. I grow moss, anubias and java fern on mine. I prefer Christmas moss to willow moss. It a little softer and greener.

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If you want substrate, I've had the best growth in tanks with a mix of planting substrate and sand. I tried to put the planting substrate (EcoComplete in one and Floramax in another) under a layer of sand, but they mix. I'm thinking that sand alone is very dense, so mulm can't get into it to act as a fertilizer. But the planting substrate is more porous and has nutrients. The mix makes it dense enough to hold roots down, but maybe it's still porous enough to let the roots suck up some of that "fertilizer." Gravel is too porous and too loose -- the plants get pulled up too easily.

I hated micro swords. They never grew, and they were easily uprooted. Overall, I believe you will have trouble with ground cover plants. Goldfish are constantly picking at the bottom, and any plant will be subject to that, whether they are eating the plant or just trying to get at fallen bits of food.

The plants I've had to most success with are crypts of different varieties, vals, swords, rotala, hornwort, anubias, jave fern and moss. What I like about crypts is that they grow in low light, the goldfish don't eat them and (most importantly in a planted goldfish tank) they generally stay planted. They develop a large root system that keeps them in place even as the fish peck around them. I have five varieties in different shapes and sizes. Swords are OK, but they are delicate -- any bit of salt, and they might melt. Vals either grow great or do nothing, and I haven't figured out why.

The substrate-less plants are the easiest. They grow well in low-medium light and can get nice and big. In one tank, I have long piece of driftwood with chunk of java fern in the middle with anubias on one end and moss on the other. In my other tank, I picked a small but tall chunk of wood and put an anubias on the tall end. The base is covered with Christmas moss. It makes for a substantial piece of greenery that adds height to the tank but doesn't take up a lot of space.

As for CO2, I dose with Flourish and Flourish Excel. I dose at water changes, and I try to dose mid-week when I remember. ;)

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I will never had wood in my tank after loosing Junbi and Pharoh to bad bacteria build up in a log that fit my 45 gallon tank.... Its just not worth it to me at all. :(

Exactly. In the wild, you have critters (such as plecos and others) that will "maintain" the wood. Additionally the wood is in a much larger water volume compared to how much water is there in a fish tank. Without "maintenance by critter", I would not want wood in any of my tanks, as pretty as it might be.

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I understand the wood in there by itself. And I'm not trying to argue. But how would any of that stuff get in there if moss is already growing over the entire thing? I would think that it would be hard for fungi to establish itself.

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I understand the wood in there by itself. And I'm not trying to argue. But how would any of that stuff get in there if moss is already growing over the entire thing? I would think that it would be hard for fungi to establish itself.

All wood will get hollow spots in it and with out the proper critter or airration under neath it, Bad bacteria will grow..... Since goldfish waste alot more than most fish, this will build up fast. Plus think of this, anything you place in the tank you now take out some of the water.... So if a tank is say 50 gallons and you add sand rocks, plants and logs well most likely that tank is now 40 gallons :yikes

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I got my driftwood before I got the nerites, and it got slimy and smelly. I almost got rid of it. But the nerites keep it "clean." Also, my driftwood creates a little cave, and the ghost shrimp live under it. It seems to be working fine in my tanks. :)

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