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What age should I relocate my commons/comets to a pond?


LovelyChaos

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I have two little commons/comets from petco who are doing marvelously. They are getting bigger and healthier every day. Unfortunately, I won't be able to keep them when they get bigger. I only want the best for them, and I can't make a pond ): So I was wondering, what age or size do they usually go into ponds? They look like they will end up being commons, but I don't know exactly which they are.

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Very few commons/comets that grow up in an aquarium ever go into a pond. Ponds are even more likely to be overstocked than aquariums since goldfish reproduce like crazy in ponds. The man from whom I got my gorgeous London Shubunkin had searched for months for someone who had room for her in their pond. He was ready to euthanize her when he showed her to me and I said I'd make room.

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Very few commons/comets that grow up in an aquarium ever go into a pond. Ponds are even more likely to be overstocked than aquariums since goldfish reproduce like crazy in ponds. The man from whom I got my gorgeous London Shubunkin had searched for months for someone who had room for her in their pond. He was ready to euthanize her when he showed her to me and I said I'd make room.

I just want to chime in to say that yes, ponds are often more likely to be overstocked than aquariums, but they are also much more likely to be able to cope with the overstocking because of their nature (harboring plants, algae, and being a much more robust ecosystem than the indoor tank). :)

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When you have to move them all depends on tank size & other stock in the tank. I wouldn't let them get past 6" before moving them... and that is if you have a 40+ gallon, lightly stocked, tank that they are in now. You could always just buy them their own large tank on Craigslist, and make your own "indoor pond" for them. The general rule of thumb for single tails is 30gal per fish... you could find a 60gal + large, complete set up for a couple of hundred pretty easily, if you look long enough (personally, I'd go for 75 gal +)... and you could have a year or so before they reach the 6" mark, depending on how big they are now. Just make sure you over filter the tank. :)

Edited by JamieMonster
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I don't believe that, Alex. The robust ecosystem, superior filtration, natural foods, and typically greater surface area are all reasons why a properly-stocked pond requires less maintenance than a properly stocked aquarium. But if your 1000 gallon pond has 200 goldfish (easy to do if you have cover for fry) you can't start doing 70% water changes twice a week. Your choices are to euthanize, find someone to take them, or wait for that ecosystem to remedy the situation with an epizootic disease. So you have craigslist ads like this. This is nicer, but just as desperate. This one at least wants you to provide a "good home."

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Well, hopefully I can find another aquarium before they get too big (: I will be overstocked when my fish get out of quarantine but hopefully I will be getting a 65 from a friend. I live in an apartment so indoor ponds are a no go. I am also hoping I will get a 125 eventually. I hope I can keep them but if not I will check around for someone with a properly stocked or under stocked pond (:

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I don't believe that, Alex. The robust ecosystem, superior filtration, natural foods, and typically greater surface area are all reasons why a properly-stocked pond requires less maintenance than a properly stocked aquarium. But if your 1000 gallon pond has 200 goldfish (easy to do if you have cover for fry) you can't start doing 70% water changes twice a week. Your choices are to euthanize, find someone to take them, or wait for that ecosystem to remedy the situation with an epizootic disease. So you have craigslist ads like this. This is nicer, but just as desperate. This one at least wants you to provide a "good home."

Shakaho, of course the 1000 gallon with 200 fish is going to have die offs, or intervention from you. What I simply meant is that pond settings probably are a bit more forgiving of some amount of overstocking than an indoor aquarium and that the maximum capacity for the outdoor pond is probably a bit higher than the indoor tank. :)

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I live in an apartment so indoor ponds are a no go. I am also hoping I will get a 125 eventually.

This is what I meant as an indoor pond- just a really big tank. ;)

Hah whoops. Yes, hopefully I get one, but that might not be for another year or so. I did find someone once with a good sized pond who was going to take my fish but I ended up keeping them.

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I get what you are saying, but I still (stubbornly) do not agree. Pond people disagree on the stocking level for goldfish but 30 to 50 gallons per fish (with excellent filtration) satisfies most. I've had overstocked ponds and they are nasty.

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What about picking up a stock tank? You can get them, in most places, for around a dollar a gallon. Not as gorgeous as a huge aquarium, but it's very budget friendly.

You can go BIIIG, and then get more fish :)

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I have two little commons/comets from petco who are doing marvelously. They are getting bigger and healthier every day. Unfortunately, I won't be able to keep them when they get bigger. I only want the best for them, and I can't make a pond ): So I was wondering, what age or size do they usually go into ponds? They look like they will end up being commons, but I don't know exactly which they are.

Keeping single tails in aquariums myself, I'd like to chime in:

What is your current setup (tank size, filtration rate, how many fish total)?

What is your maintenance/water change routine?

What exactly are these single tails, commons (short tailed) or comets (long tailed)? Would you be able to post a couple photos? :)

I might get yelled at, but I disagree with the "fact" that single tails require more water volume than fancy goldfish, when kept in an aquarium.

Considered that goldfish produce waste in relation to their weight, a 5" fat round oranda will produce significantly more waste than a 5" slender comet, since the comet will probably weigh only 60%-75% of what the oranda weighs.

The single tails do require a lot of swimming room though, which can easily be done by using a long tank, like a 40gallon breeder tank, or a 55g or larger. As long as the tank has much surface area and a good length, and you have a proper maintenance routine for your tank, then a single tailed goldfish might do perfectly fine with 10 gallons.

Single tails rarely get as huge as you often see them, unless they get to live in a large water volume like 50gallons or more per fish. But as shakaho pointed out, these circumstances are actually difficult to find since in most ponds, goldfish will reproduce like bunnies and end up overstocking the pond more than your aquarium would be (considered your aquarium most likely receives higher maintenance and larger water changes than a pond).

If you are attached to them, and unless you have your very own pond that you yourself maintain and control, the fish are probably safer in your aquarium - if you can provide at least 10 gallons for each of them.

You could also increase the water changes until you can upgrade your tank, and maybe add some life plants for nitrate absorption. That is what I am doing since I have a couple overstocked tanks. Instead of one weekly water change, do it twice! :)

And just so no one gets me wrong:

The more water volume can be provided to ANY goldfish - independent of what breed they are - the better it is for the fish. I am in no way trying to promote overstocking or similar. I am just answering about the "what's best for the fish", because as said, on the long run they are probably better off in an environment controlled by yourself. :)

Edited by Oerba Yun Fang
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I agree with Fang! Of course, as with all goldfish, the more space and water volume you can provide the better. But unfortunately life doesn't always work that way!

My commons might be stunted due to not knowing anything about goldfish when I bought them (not even 10gal per fish back then I am sad to say), but they are coming up for 10 years old now despite this, and while they're small for commons (about 5 inches), they're still growing and seem happy and healthy. Of course I really regret not knowing more way back when, and would never advise anyone to start out that way - but commons are very tough, adaptable fish.

I think as long as your fish have a good amount of room to swim and grow (like Fang says, it's quite unlikely you're going to get seriously huge fish, but bare it in mind just incase), proper filtration and a good water change routine, they will probably do well in a tank. It's all about putting the work in - and unless you get very lucky and find someone with a pond who knows what they're doing, I feel they will be alot better off with you :)

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They are currently situated in a 55 gallon tank and share it with La, my small telescope. They will share their tank in the end with 4 fish. A 1.5 inch oranda, 2 2.5 inch telescopes, and 1 4 inch oranda. The general consensus is that they are commons, but many have said they have positively identified their own fish as commons, later to find out they are comets. They were labled as comets at petco. They are about 1.5 inches each. I quite love them, they are very cute. I am hoping that I get a 65 soon.

My tank specs:

55 gallon, 2x Penguin 350's, and there will be 6 fish when everyone is out of quarantine (2 commons, 2 telescopes, 2 orandas). I change 80% of the water twice/ 3 times a week. There are also 2 java ferns, and 2 unidentified ferns, with 6 lucky bamboo.

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There are very few ponds which provide such generous accommodations as 65 gallons for two fish. While the recommended water changes for a pond are 10% a week, most people do less. You are treating your fish very well.

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There are very few ponds which provide such generous accommodations as 65 gallons for two fish. While the recommended water changes for a pond are 10% a week, most people do less. You are treating your fish very well.

Thank you! That means a lot to me. I hope I can continue treating them well! The 65 is custom and I have yet to try my hand at resealing a tank, so hopefully it was treated well. I find it a lot easier to do bigger water changes now that I have a longer siphon and primer (: I am so happy that they are doing so well, especially for being feeders and used to start my cycle (I didn't realize this was a no-no). One has even gotten over an illness causing clamped fins and they even recovered from ammonia burns. I am excited to see them get bigger, especially because it isn't obvious if they are commons or comets!

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If you can get that 65 gallon- it would be plenty of space for them for life. If you set it up with a bog filter, in addition to a regular filter, even better. It would really be like their own little indoor pond... they most likely won't get better than that outside. :D

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The setup, the bamboo are now in the filters.

DSCN1429.jpg

Vonnegut and Rowling (the one in focus is Vonnegut, the other Rowling)

Vonnegut is now more pale and no longer has clamped fins

DSCN1335.jpg

Vonnegut

DSCN1331.jpg

Rowling

DSCN1333.jpg

Edited by LovelyChaos
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Very nice pictures!

I love the look of plants in a tank, but I have a hard enough time keeping the FISH alive, without adding anything else! Lol!

Edited by yafashelli
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Very nice pictures!

I love the look of plants in a tank, but I have a hard enough time keeping the FISH alive, without adding anything else! Lol!

Well my next plan is to add tons of plants, some pots, a large buddah, and maybe some dragons and taking out the gravel. I would rather not deal with gravel and gravel cleaning after what happened to Tui ):

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