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Substrate Question


polka_spotty

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Does anyone know of a fairly inexpensive substrate that doesn't come in bulk?

I'm just starting to look into planting my tank and I don't exactly want to spend a lot on a ton of substrate on a college budget when I probably won't use that much.

Also has anyone tried to pot their plants in small glass containers and done so with success?

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many people on the forum use moon sand as substrate for planting..............

those who do bare bottom have good success with putting plants in glass containers with gravel in the containers..........

I haven't tried plants in mine...........although I am looking at a couple of plants at Petsmart..........right now I have ONE tall fake plant behind some Large river rocks~~~mostly a bare bottom tank, super easy to keep clean.......... :D

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I was looking into some beginner plants on Planted Aquariums Central. I am getting my little oranda soon and I have read about them shredding up moss balls and such.

I've had my moss ball for awhile and I'd really like to make sure it doesn't get nommed on. So I've been checking on alternative aquarium plants.

So far I've looked into Baby tears and anubias, is it possible to keep baby tears in pots? I know they usually are used as mats and floor cover.

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Baby tears often fall into the yummy snack category. And ground covers generally require high light and CO2 systems.

I'm a big fan of substrate because I think it's a more natural environment for the fish. Mine spend much of their time sifting through the sand in search of leftover nomnoms. But unless you are truly planting your substrate, you don't need much, which makes it much cheaper.

If you want a planted substrate, a cheap option is pool filter sand or general purpose sand. I got a 50 pound bag of pfs for $9.99. You want to look for sand with slightly bigger grains. If the grains are too fine (play sand is often too fine), then you'll have a cloudy mess. You would need to use fertilizer root tabs for root-feeding plants. Good plants are any types of crypts, vals or swords.

Another option is plants in small containers or plants that grow on driftwood or rocks. Anubias, java fern and moss balls all are nice plants that do well in standard lighting and don't require a substrate. You can put them over a shallow substrate for a more natural look, or go bare bottom.

I like the look of gravel, but it's harder to plant in and harder to clean, imo.

Edited by ShawneeRiver
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I have successfully kept several different types of plants in glass pots in my bare bottom tank :)

Baby tears are pretty delicate plants and at a high risk for being nibbled by your fish (although not all goldies eat plants). Regular baby tears might be able to be kept in a pot, and they are slightly less picky in terms of lighting and co2 requirements than the dwarf variety, but the dwarf baby tears (which are smaller typically used as ground cover) would be be better suited for a larger area of substrate and require good (moderate to high) lighting and would do best in a high tech set up (which can be tricky on a budget).

Plants are really trial and error. Some goldfish will eat plants like the tank is their own personal salad bar while others could care less. You can't really go wrong with anubias and java fern (but these will do best tied to rocks or wood like koko said). Other good goldfish tank plants that would do well in pots are amazon sword, vallisinaria, and any crypts.

If you are new to plants I would suggest starting out with hardy, easy, low light plants to get your feet wet and then branch out from there :)

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That would probably be safe to say. A lot of people get the little glass vases from craft stores. I prefer the little glass jars with lids (don't use the lids, of course ;) ). Mine were $1, and the bottoms are wider than the tops, which gives space for roots and makes them less tippy.

Edited by ShawneeRiver
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Btw, I would stick to crypts and sword if you use containers. I think vals would come up and try to spread and not work quite as well.

What kind of setup do you have, polka? :)

I have grown vals in containers just fine :) Sometimes the babies do not quite get their roots in the substrate so you just have to pick them off and plant them.

I use tea light or votive holders from the craft store. They work great and come in a variety of shapes/sizes

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Deb, are you planting in a substrate? What substrate?

probably just go with containers, rocks, drift wood.............mostly in the topical tank..............goldies will just have to be ok with fake ones.............. ;)

I didn't mean to hijack this post............but I figured the original poster would like the same info............... :hummm

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