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Peterlock

Omega 1 Gold Fish Food - WARNING!

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Ever since Hikari down graded their food to little more than wheat and useless filler ( I have a review regarding this issue some where around here) I've been using Omega 1 Goldfish sinking pellets as a supplemental food to the diet I feed my fish.

I picked up some Omega Betta food and was alarmed to see the formula included "Ethoxyquin" which was listed as preservative. It's not a preservative - Ethoxyquin is a pesticide and it's lethal. I immediately checked the ingredients on the Omega 1 Gold Fish food and there it was listed as a "Preservative"

Ethoxyquin has been controversial, it's been used in low quality dog and cat food for years to prevent fats from becoming rancid which is exactly what vitamin E does. So I did hours of research and here are the facts.

The FDA has issued a warning that Ethoxyquin destroys the liver and enforced a minimum allowance of 775/PPM yet many pet food manufacturers continue to use it and ignore the FDA warning.Ethoxyquin stores in the liver and compromises liver function over time, it's deadly stuff - period.

Ethoxyquin is considered dangerous for any animal food by the following agencies:

*The FDA

*The National Pesticide Information council

*The Natural Resources Defense Council

*The Veterinary Pesticide Portal

What is more, a study you can find on Wikipidea and link to - concludes that Ethoxyquin is lethal to fish.

Here's the link:

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Ethoxyquin

Ironically, the food has excellent ingredients - whole fish by name salmon, halibut and others. Plus lot's of high end quality ingredients.Why Omega Sea chose to compromise such a well balanced food with a known and lethal pesticide is beyond me. I have written Omega Sea four times over three weeks. Not a single response - why? because they can't possibly justify it.

I would urge anyone to stop immediately if you're currently using this food. If you're not - avoid it like the plague as it will in time, kill your fish.

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Peter, glad to see you around!

Clearly, you've missed the food revolution around here! :rofl

We've been encouraging people to dispense with pellet, and try something much better, and ethoxyquin free :P

Check it out. You should definitely try it as well :)

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/101320-review-repashy-soilent-green-gel-premix-powder/

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I was actually thinking about buying some of this stuff for my fish :o

Thanks for the information.

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Oh man! :yikes I always feed Omega One. :(

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Oh man! :yikes I always feed Omega One. :(

You and me both...ugh. Well better late than never. Shawnee is that your Tattoo? it's gorgeous. I'm having a portrait of Harley my bull dog done, I start with a 5 hour session this Thursday, can't wait. It'll be a half sleeve, Harley and gold fish the artist is Javier Eastman, I researched for months and fell in love with his work.

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I was actually thinking about buying some of this stuff for my fish :o

Thanks for the information.

Goldy I'm so glad you caught the review then - steer clear of Omega 1 :)

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DDD: But I only just went out and bought a big thing of pellets ): This is immensely depressing..

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I hated this food. I fed it twice and my goldies were extremely floaty.

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To be honest, I am feeding this as one of my staples for years now, and have not noticed any more issues than with any other food I tried.

Still, after I recently received my sample of Soilent Green (which I still need to prepare), I might fully switch to this if I am satisfied with the result :)

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I'd like to see some real data on this subject. The "toxicity to fish" is based on one study on rainbow trout that concluded the chemical was "slightly toxic." with an LD50 of 18,000ug/l. So how much is in a fish food which lists it as the very last ingredient?

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Haha, you know what I just threw that stuff out of my home. I had bought some for emergencies, wow Im glad I never used it :o

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I'd like to see some real data on this subject. The "toxicity to fish" is based on one study on rainbow trout that concluded the chemical was "slightly toxic." with an LD50 of 18,000ug/l. So how much is in a fish food which lists it as the very last ingredient?

I provided a number of resources not just the mention of Wikipedia - still have questions? roll up your sleeves, pick up a telephone, fire up your computer and do some real research. Maybe others will be so inclined - however, I have no intention of doing your homework for you.

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Haha, you know what I just threw that stuff out of my home. I had bought some for emergencies, wow Im glad I never used it :o

ha! atta girl ~ remember when I threw out $40 worth of Hikari? I would say we're even :)

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Haha, you know what I just threw that stuff out of my home. I had bought some for emergencies, wow Im glad I never used it :o

ha! atta girl ~ remember when I threw out $40 worth of Hikari? I would say we're even :)

:rofl:tomuch:

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Unfortunately it is found in many fish foods. All fish meal that is imported must be treated with a preservative to prevent rancidity. So preservatives are found in nearly every fish food. I've done a good deal of research on the subject and I still feed omega one as part of my pellet mix.

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Everything can become toxic at higher enough levels, even vitamins, and the only test carried out (that I can seem to find) on animals proving that ethoxyquin poses a threat used the chemical well above 3000ppm, when the limit allowed in pet foods (I am not entirely sure) is around 75-150ppm ( I know that the FDA actually approved a set amount allowed in foods).

Still, don't get me wrong, I am as suspicious of products containing chemicals that are not very well documented in terms of health issues posed to people and animals and I tend to keep away from them. I know little on the chemical, but after looking through some edu sites on the chemical, I have read many mixed viewpoints, both science and opinion based. It seems to be a controversial and under-researched chemical and really needs some strong, accredited evidence behind it. :)

Edited by Narny105

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Haha, you know what I just threw that stuff out of my home. I had bought some for emergencies, wow Im glad I never used it :o

ha! atta girl ~ remember when I threw out $40 worth of Hikari? I would say we're even :)

:rofl:tomuch:

Eek! i've fed them 1 jar, and i'm half way down the 2nd.....................................going in the bin :no::banned2:

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On this occaission i'm glad UK has stringent consumer laws, and this stuff, is not availeable on UK shelfs, had to get mine by other means.

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Right at this moment i'm down to repashy.........also nervous about pro-gold now, since the ingredients are not even fully disclosed.

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Haha, you know what I just threw that stuff out of my home. I had bought some for emergencies, wow Im glad I never used it :o

ha! atta girl ~ remember when I threw out $40 worth of Hikari? I would say we're even :)

:rofl:tomuch:

i threw out 2x jars of NLS £xxxx, brand new

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I hate to say this, but unless you are making the fish food yourself, you should assume that there is ethoxyquin in the food. As Pearlscaleperfect said, all imported fish meals are mandated to contain a preservative, and ethoxyquin is still the preservative of choice.

Here is what New Life Spectrum wrote on their website:

http://nlsfishfood.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63&limit=1&limitstart=5

So, either make your own food and throw all commercial fish foods out, or know they all foods contain ethoxyquin. Omega One just lists it in their ingredients, while others do not.

___________________________________________________

Preservatives and Why They Are Necessary

Mentioning the topic of pet food preservatives seems to cause a lengthy debate in almost any pet-keeping circle, especially if the use of ethoxyquin comes up.

The whole ethoxyquin scare started from a single rumor, which became so blown out of proportion via internet chat forums that it eventually turned into another urban myth.

The only reason that this preservative ever came into question was due to a study performed on rats back in 1987 where the dose level of 5,000 ppm ethoxyquin, which is far higher than approved levels in pet food, suggested a carcinogenic potential. Ethoxyquin has since been blamed for a myriad of problems, none of which have ever been proven.

Considering the outcry over this preservative by dog owners worldwide, one would think that by now there would be a plethora of data/studies that actually proved that this preservative caused at least some type of long-term health issue in pets.

3_08.jpg There is not a single documented case where ethoxyquin used at approved levels has been found to cause any type of long term negative health condition in a dog, cat, fish, or otherwise. One would think that with all of the hysterical anti-ethoxyquin crusades that have taken place over the past 20 years or so that at least one non-biased study would be able to prove that this substance can cause serious long term health issues in pets, even when used at appropriate or approved levels. Yet to date, there is not a single shred of scientific evidence that supports such a view.

The fact is that this single preservative has probably saved countless lives of pets from suffering from serious health issues caused by rancid fat.

Without preservatives, the oil found in fish food would become rancid in very short order. What many hobbyists do not understand is that all fish meal-based products will contain ethoxyquin. There is simply no getting around that. The manufacturer may have ethoxyquin listed on their label as a preservative, yet may not even be adding this ingredient at their end. This is precisely the case with New Life Spectrum products. New Life International, Inc. does not directly add ethoxyquin to any of our foods.

j_144x72.jpg What most hobbyists fail to understand is that every fish food that uses marine proteins such as Krill, Fish, Shrimp, etc., will contain a small amount of ethoxyquin, as will some fats that are added to the formula. The United States Coast Guard regulations (Subpart 148.04 -9) requires any vessel entering US waters that contains fish meal, to have the fish meal preserved with ethoxyquin. This is required by law for the safety and health issues that can arise if fish meal is not preserved properly. I personally know of no manufacturer that makes their own in-house fish meal on site, which means that if fish meal is being used in a food, any type of pet food, there will be at least a small amount of ethoxyquin in the final formula.

When used accordingly, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using ethoxyquin as a preservative. The FDA approved the use of ethoxyquin as a preservative for both humans and pets, and for decades the maximum amount allowed in pet food was 150 PPM.

In July 1997, after assessing the results of the latest study on ethoxyquin, the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine asked that the maximum amount of the preservative be voluntarily reduced to 75 parts per million in complete dog foods. The FDA stated that the earlier limit of 150 ppm "may not provide an adequate margin of safety in lactating female dogs and possibly puppies." The reason being that lactating female dogs generally consume far more food (2-3 times) than non-lactating females, hence an increased level of every substance in any food will occur. The study showed ethoxyquin levels of 150 ppm had no adverse health effects at maintenance levels, but that by reducing the max amount to 75 ppm it would create an additional safety margin for lactating females and their puppies.

5_02.jpg To date, the FDA has found no scientific or medical evidence that ethoxyquin used at approved levels is injurious to human or animal health. Also, the FDA has found no documentation of the claims of harm to any animal. Not even one.

Please keep in mind that almost everything and anything can become toxic at high enough levels, including fat-soluble vitamins. No nutritionist would recommend completely eliminating vitamin A, B, D, E and K from the diet just because high levels can be toxic, yet this exact type of logic is what's used when most people discuss preservatives such as ethoxyquin. When used in small amounts to prevent rancidity, preservatives are valuable and important components of the diet.

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Forgot to say, thank-you for the alert..................another one of those too good to be true things

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I hate to say this, but unless you are making the fish food yourself, you should assume that there is ethoxyquin in the food. As Pearlscaleperfect said, all imported fish meals are mandated to contain a preservative, and ethoxyquin is still the preservative of choice.

Here is what New Life Spectrum wrote on their website:

http://nlsfishfood.c...=1&limitstart=5

So, either make your own food and throw all commercial fish foods out, or know they all foods contain ethoxyquin. Omega One just lists it in their ingredients, while others do not.

___________________________________________________

Preservatives and Why They Are Necessary

Mentioning the topic of pet food preservatives seems to cause a lengthy debate in almost any pet-keeping circle, especially if the use of ethoxyquin comes up.

The whole ethoxyquin scare started from a single rumor, which became so blown out of proportion via internet chat forums that it eventually turned into another urban myth.

The only reason that this preservative ever came into question was due to a study performed on rats back in 1987 where the dose level of 5,000 ppm ethoxyquin, which is far higher than approved levels in pet food, suggested a carcinogenic potential. Ethoxyquin has since been blamed for a myriad of problems, none of which have ever been proven.

Considering the outcry over this preservative by dog owners worldwide, one would think that by now there would be a plethora of data/studies that actually proved that this preservative caused at least some type of long-term health issue in pets.

3_08.jpg There is not a single documented case where ethoxyquin used at approved levels has been found to cause any type of long term negative health condition in a dog, cat, fish, or otherwise. One would think that with all of the hysterical anti-ethoxyquin crusades that have taken place over the past 20 years or so that at least one non-biased study would be able to prove that this substance can cause serious long term health issues in pets, even when used at appropriate or approved levels. Yet to date, there is not a single shred of scientific evidence that supports such a view.

The fact is that this single preservative has probably saved countless lives of pets from suffering from serious health issues caused by rancid fat.

Without preservatives, the oil found in fish food would become rancid in very short order. What many hobbyists do not understand is that all fish meal-based products will contain ethoxyquin. There is simply no getting around that. The manufacturer may have ethoxyquin listed on their label as a preservative, yet may not even be adding this ingredient at their end. This is precisely the case with New Life Spectrum products. New Life International, Inc. does not directly add ethoxyquin to any of our foods.

j_144x72.jpg What most hobbyists fail to understand is that every fish food that uses marine proteins such as Krill, Fish, Shrimp, etc., will contain a small amount of ethoxyquin, as will some fats that are added to the formula. The United States Coast Guard regulations (Subpart 148.04 -9) requires any vessel entering US waters that contains fish meal, to have the fish meal preserved with ethoxyquin. This is required by law for the safety and health issues that can arise if fish meal is not preserved properly. I personally know of no manufacturer that makes their own in-house fish meal on site, which means that if fish meal is being used in a food, any type of pet food, there will be at least a small amount of ethoxyquin in the final formula.

When used accordingly, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using ethoxyquin as a preservative. The FDA approved the use of ethoxyquin as a preservative for both humans and pets, and for decades the maximum amount allowed in pet food was 150 PPM.

In July 1997, after assessing the results of the latest study on ethoxyquin, the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine asked that the maximum amount of the preservative be voluntarily reduced to 75 parts per million in complete dog foods. The FDA stated that the earlier limit of 150 ppm "may not provide an adequate margin of safety in lactating female dogs and possibly puppies." The reason being that lactating female dogs generally consume far more food (2-3 times) than non-lactating females, hence an increased level of every substance in any food will occur. The study showed ethoxyquin levels of 150 ppm had no adverse health effects at maintenance levels, but that by reducing the max amount to 75 ppm it would create an additional safety margin for lactating females and their puppies.

5_02.jpg To date, the FDA has found no scientific or medical evidence that ethoxyquin used at approved levels is injurious to human or animal health. Also, the FDA has found no documentation of the claims of harm to any animal. Not even one.

Please keep in mind that almost everything and anything can become toxic at high enough levels, including fat-soluble vitamins. No nutritionist would recommend completely eliminating vitamin A, B, D, E and K from the diet just because high levels can be toxic, yet this exact type of logic is what's used when most people discuss preservatives such as ethoxyquin. When used in small amounts to prevent rancidity, preservatives are valuable and important components of the diet.

Alex,

Not all fish meal is preserved with Ethoxyquin if it is it must under FDA law be disclosed. So what has happened is that pet foods in general list it as a preservative.

Aqueon is Ethoxyquin free and actually a very decent food at a surprisingly low price. My fish adore it.

Commercial pet food manufactures are brilliant at lying to consumers.

For example if you see lamb as the first ingredient in a dog food. That was while it was in it's raw state so it goes to the top of the list of ingredients.

However, animal flesh is 75% + water this is why meal is a much better ingredient to look for in the listings of ingredients - because it's based on a real percentage and weight after processing and cooking.

The first three ingredients of any pet food should crystal clear. Words like "Ocean Fish" are what we in advertising call "weasel words" they mean nothing, it's all fluff. It's akin to listing "flying bird meat" When you see whole halibut, whole Salmon that's a sign of quality and in a perfect world these companies would forego their greed and produce safer and higher quality foods.

People will continue to buy foods loaded with pesticides.

The industry is careless and never held accountable. How many people send their fish that have died out for a toxicology report? Zero or close to it. One it's expensive, Two people often don't make the connection that behavioral and health issues they see in their pets are related to the toxins in the food they feed them.

It's for these reasons I make my own dog food, my recipe was trial and error and took years. At the end of the day it's up to us to protect the animals we love.There are a couple of good fish foods out there in addition to Aqueon, AZoo is excellent, take a look at the ingrediants you'll be impressed - and Cobalt among others.

I read the information you put in your post - this is typical of researchers, nutritionists, veterinarians who have a vested interest in justifying the use of Toxic ingredients.

Consider Permethrin it's been around forever as the key pesticide for flea an tick control. It's deadly to cats. If you have a dog as well as cats and treat your dog with a Permethian based flea control all it takes is a tiny transfer to kill the cat.

In the 2001 disaster which made national news coverage when thousands of dogs and cats died from Hartz Flea and Tick control it was due to Permethrin. Never give an ounce of credibility to any study, report, dispute of facts provided by research funded by the company that produces and profits from selling a lethal product.

Edited by PeterD

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Peter, for me, this discussion is purely academic, since I've taken steps to avoid most commercial fish foods, except for Repashy, which does not contain ethoxyquin, btw.

What I do not like about the Aqueon granules is that they too play tricks with labeling. The fish meal is salmon, herring, OR other mixed fish, which leaves room for all kinds of unknown. How often is the meal mixed fish, and how much of salmon or herring? The next two ingredients are soybean meal and wheat flour. This is way too much filler for me to accept. :(

Contrast this to the Repashy gel ingredient, and you will find something much more akin to what fish might actually consume.

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