Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
PaintingPintos

Black Moor is COMPLETELY orange

Recommended Posts

Ok, so on the FAQ, it says that Black Moors may turn gold/yellow/orange according to their ancestry, due to the impurity of their breed. But.....mine started turning color in the beginning of the Summer, and in the last 2 weeks he went from 1/8 gold to around 15/16 orange. I mean he is COMPLETELY orange. This only started happening when the water temperature rose. Is this normal?? What should I even call him now? Nobody will believe me if I say he's a Black Moor, and the whole "yin yang" thing going with my white Pearlscale was pretty cute.

So is this normal or what!?!?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:rofl :rofl completely normal.. looool.. call him a telescope.. of the weird kind.. but still cute :heart do you care to share pics? :ehh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love love to see pictures of your now new orange telescope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hahaha I'll get pics later today! Right now I think I broke my videocamera (that also takes pictures) when it fell off the dryer downstairs >.>

Whenever I turn it on it makes this weird clicking/grinding noise and the screen stays black, but still makes noise. I cannot take pictures or video, and sometimes it refuses to turn off unless I take out the battery!!!

I have to plug my digital camera into my sister's computer, since when I put it on this laptop, everything shuts down and there's a weird error message that pops up

O___________________________________________________O

All problems aside, I'll go take some pictures now because I know where my camera is (I hope) :bye2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally normal. Black is a notoriously unstable colour. I just acquired a moor myself and I doubt she will hold her colour long term. :)

The impurity of the breed is true. Moors are traditionally a single tailed, long bodied, telescope eyed, jet black fish. The modern moor is an offshoot of that breed, possibly bred with the wuhan (Another traditional telescope variety), veiltail and other breeds to produce a compact body, double fins, and tele eyes. Unfortunately, black is notoriously unstable, and modern moors generally don’t have a stable black due to the introduction of many other colour genes from outbreeding. So they may appear black, but there genome can carry a variety of colours, have genes telling them to lose their colour (like fry do) and so on, making them risky colour wise. Keeping them outside so they receive UV (promotes pigment production) and colourfeeding (feeding them foods rich in pigments or compounds easily converted to pigments that will deposit in the skin) them seems to help some, but it’s ultimately up to the fish’s genetics, and once they start to lose their black, its gone. Of course there are strains of moors, and many individuals too, that keep their black their entire life. Black wuhan telescopes typically keep their black, and many breeders have good strains of moors that also keep their colour. Black is difficult to breed like that, it’s only recently I’ve been seeing black ranchu that are even half likely to keep their colour available en mass to the market, for example (as it’s taken this long to breed reliable strains of them in) rather than the occasional adult, who through some genetic lottery kept his or her colours.

Fish have layers of pigment. In moors this seems to usually be a white layer, masked by an orange, with both being masked by a black. When the fish loses its black pigments, the orange shows through. Sometimes on the bellies of older moors with less dense black you can see bronze scales, which is the underlying pigment not being completely masked. It’s totally normal. :) Panda moors are black moors with a white pigment underlying (no orange) going through a colour change. Sometimes orange fish change to white (lose the orange pigment, reveal the underlying white), that’s another common one. Blue fish also typically, if they undergo a colour change, change to white, with any previous bronze patches changing to orange (sarasa markings/colour).

Colour changes are perfectly normal for a goldfish :) Not all will have them, especially if the fish is white or orange as those colours are particularly stable, but blues, blacks and the likes sometimes do. Colour change is in our fish’s genes. Most of our fry, for example, undergo a colour change to lose their fry green/bronze and become the vibrant fish we know and love. Sometimes in their adult life this happens too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally normal. Black is a notoriously unstable colour. I just acquired a moor myself and I doubt she will hold her colour long term. :)

The impurity of the breed is true. Moors are traditionally a single tailed, long bodied, telescope eyed, jet black fish. The modern moor is an offshoot of that breed, possibly bred with the wuhan (Another traditional telescope variety), veiltail and other breeds to produce a compact body, double fins, and tele eyes. Unfortunately, black is notoriously unstable, and modern moors generally don’t have a stable black due to the introduction of many other colour genes from outbreeding. So they may appear black, but there genome can carry a variety of colours, have genes telling them to lose their colour (like fry do) and so on, making them risky colour wise. Keeping them outside so they receive UV (promotes pigment production) and colourfeeding (feeding them foods rich in pigments or compounds easily converted to pigments that will deposit in the skin) them seems to help some, but it’s ultimately up to the fish’s genetics, and once they start to lose their black, its gone. Of course there are strains of moors, and many individuals too, that keep their black their entire life. Black wuhan telescopes typically keep their black, and many breeders have good strains of moors that also keep their colour. Black is difficult to breed like that, it’s only recently I’ve been seeing black ranchu that are even half likely to keep their colour available en mass to the market, for example (as it’s taken this long to breed reliable strains of them in) rather than the occasional adult, who through some genetic lottery kept his or her colours.

Fish have layers of pigment. In moors this seems to usually be a white layer, masked by an orange, with both being masked by a black. When the fish loses its black pigments, the orange shows through. Sometimes on the bellies of older moors with less dense black you can see bronze scales, which is the underlying pigment not being completely masked. It’s totally normal. :) Panda moors are black moors with a white pigment underlying (no orange) going through a colour change. Sometimes orange fish change to white (lose the orange pigment, reveal the underlying white), that’s another common one. Blue fish also typically, if they undergo a colour change, change to white, with any previous bronze patches changing to orange (sarasa markings/colour).

Colour changes are perfectly normal for a goldfish :) Not all will have them, especially if the fish is white or orange as those colours are particularly stable, but blues, blacks and the likes sometimes do. Colour change is in our fish’s genes. Most of our fry, for example, undergo a colour change to lose their fry green/bronze and become the vibrant fish we know and love. Sometimes in their adult life this happens too.

very interesting................Hope Caldwell keeps the black~~~but I don't care if she would turn colors.............she already went from a HE to a SHE... :teehee

Edited by Sharkbait3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Othello is holding on to his black for the last 2.5 years, but I do not think that this will be the case for too long lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Myng is as black of a Ranch I have every had... I will have had him now for a year this weekend :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shhhh i don't want to scare the pants off him incase that's what's keeping his colour on.. david, my moor has been solid black since i got him 2 years ago.. like i said.. shhhhhhhh..... :rofl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black seems to be getting more stable as we breed better and better strains, so don’t worry too much, there’s a great chance your blackies will stay black! ;)

The best analogy I can think of is like a wall. You put a layer or white on, you paint over that with orange, then that with black. The other colours are still there, but the black masks them all. If you remove the black you see the orange, if you then remove the orange you see the white.

Fish with NO colour whatsoever are coloured like china doll teles. Golden/transparent skin and fins, and red eyes. White fish with red eyes still have the white pigment layer and are not technically colourless.

Of course there can be other colour layers too, and various patterns (white/red) and all those crazy things, so each and every fish is an individual. I know of one person who had a jet black ranchu lift his black colour to be a beautiful sunburst yellow, and another who shown he had sarasa markings (red/white) under his black when it lifted.

Fish are crazy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an oranda, Digger, that started out black and orange. Then he turned bronze but kept his mostly orange cap. Then he changed to a more light brown that bronze. Now he is turning almost completely golden orange. He seems to be keeping his darker orange cap. His fins had mostly stayed brownish black now seem to be turning clear from the ends up, this is giving him a raggedy appearance, like they are damaged, but they aren't they are just clear running in to the brown. I don't know how he will end up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My black ranchu is more of a chocolate now, and I can see what looks like red an white under her brown. She faded quickly after I got her, but now she's more stable. I hope she stays as she is, but I doubt she will. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AGHHH! We got a power outage, PLUS my camera is being a crazy thing whenever I plug it in. All these error messages pop up, so I'll have to check up on that with my dad. Other than that, I've been leaving my bedroom window open at night so it cools down to about 60 degrees--not too cold for the budgies, they have a thick cover over their cage, but it's REALLY cold for me, LOL.

The goldfish tank is down to 75 degrees, but poor Houston is still being stripped of his beautiful color. The parts that first started turning orange are now gradually turning pale gold-- I expect that will happen with the rest of him. Poor little guy xD

Actually, he's about 4 inches long and he's around 1/2 inch longer than little Pearl, my Pearlscale princess.

Houston is growing at an alarming rate!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally normal. Black is a notoriously unstable colour. I just acquired a moor myself and I doubt she will hold her colour long term. :)

The impurity of the breed is true. Moors are traditionally a single tailed, long bodied, telescope eyed, jet black fish. The modern moor is an offshoot of that breed, possibly bred with the wuhan (Another traditional telescope variety), veiltail and other breeds to produce a compact body, double fins, and tele eyes. Unfortunately, black is notoriously unstable, and modern moors generally don’t have a stable black due to the introduction of many other colour genes from outbreeding. So they may appear black, but there genome can carry a variety of colours, have genes telling them to lose their colour (like fry do) and so on, making them risky colour wise. Keeping them outside so they receive UV (promotes pigment production) and colourfeeding (feeding them foods rich in pigments or compounds easily converted to pigments that will deposit in the skin) them seems to help some, but it’s ultimately up to the fish’s genetics, and once they start to lose their black, its gone. Of course there are strains of moors, and many individuals too, that keep their black their entire life. Black wuhan telescopes typically keep their black, and many breeders have good strains of moors that also keep their colour. Black is difficult to breed like that, it’s only recently I’ve been seeing black ranchu that are even half likely to keep their colour available en mass to the market, for example (as it’s taken this long to breed reliable strains of them in) rather than the occasional adult, who through some genetic lottery kept his or her colours.

Fish have layers of pigment. In moors this seems to usually be a white layer, masked by an orange, with both being masked by a black. When the fish loses its black pigments, the orange shows through. Sometimes on the bellies of older moors with less dense black you can see bronze scales, which is the underlying pigment not being completely masked. It’s totally normal. :) Panda moors are black moors with a white pigment underlying (no orange) going through a colour change. Sometimes orange fish change to white (lose the orange pigment, reveal the underlying white), that’s another common one. Blue fish also typically, if they undergo a colour change, change to white, with any previous bronze patches changing to orange (sarasa markings/colour).

Colour changes are perfectly normal for a goldfish :) Not all will have them, especially if the fish is white or orange as those colours are particularly stable, but blues, blacks and the likes sometimes do. Colour change is in our fish’s genes. Most of our fry, for example, undergo a colour change to lose their fry green/bronze and become the vibrant fish we know and love. Sometimes in their adult life this happens too.

So, it doesn't have to do with your lighting. I have a Colormax Flourescent bulb and was wondering if it was insufficient to help sustain their color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My chocolate pearlscale varies from day to day. She was pretty dark when in 09 I got her and is gradually getting lighter, I'm suspecting she'll eventually turn yellow as that seems to be the color underneath the chocolate. It'll be neat if/when it does happen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago I had a big black moor and we had a heat wave. Within 2 weeks he became an orange tele like yours! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
  • Create New...