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Commerical food that is least likely to cause floating?

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I'm soon to go on a 12 days vacation and want something to feed my 2 fishes for the duration with an auto feeder. I've read that it's ok to starve them up to 1 week, or maybe even 10 days, but I think it's kind of cruel and in my case it's longer.

One of my fish would gasp for air and get floaty after all kind of commercial foods, even just one pellet. I've tried saki-hikari, hikari lionhead, omega one, and some flakes. I have some anacharis in my tank right now and they don't seem to be interest much.

Obviously I can't put gel or fresh food in the auto feeder. So what do you guys recommend? I'm thinking maybe algea wafers?

My tank is a 29g. Two orandas around 3 - 3.5 inches head to tail. 400gph filtration. Some live plants that keep nitrate below 10ppm even after 1 week w/o water change.

And what auto feeder most reliable? I'm not too concern about the exact amount of feeding, but more about reliable performance, something that still function like it should be even after 1 week with no check-up, drying, or unclogging. My water level is filled pretty high to prolong evaporation and to prevent strong downpour that push my sand around, which means my glass top is always damp at every corner.

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I would go with the Fishmate F14, as several members of this forum have used this with great success.

As for commercial food, try Pro-Gold from goldfishconnection.com :)

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You and Pro-Gold....

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You and Pro-Gold....

I been using it for so many years :thumb:

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Thank once again. I will get the Fishmate F14.

As for Pro-Gold, I've read many people fishes have floating problem with it, even more notorious than the Hikari sinking pellets. Algae wafers crossed my mind because I thought it would be 'veggie/green' food similar to peas or spinach that my fish has no problem with.

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I actually have used basically all the pellets out there, including some very hard to find Japanese pellets. Pro-Gold consistently is the best, and the least offender in terms of causing floatiness.

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You also could add some duckweed for them to much on while you are gone. It's like giving them a salad bar. ;)

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I imagine that after a week without food, they'd start giving your anacharis some very hungry looks indeed.

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Can you have someone trustworthy to pop by once (or twice). Have premeasured pouches of food for them to pour in?

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I bought pro gold and I like it but I do find if I don't give it along with some squash or zucchini he seems to get a little off kilter. So now everyday he gets some pro gold, some tetra fin plus flakes, some freeze dried blood worms and some fresh cooked veggies at least with breakfast and dinner. I usually give the freeze dried blood worms as a mid day snack by itself. He has gotten awfully spoiled, no wonder why he rushes to the surface every time I open the lid now.

Thats just my experience but I'd be hesitant to use the pro gold all by itself for two weeks without having some type of veggie to go with it.

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I had a sick betta refuse food for two months and he rebounded just fine. If your goldies are in good shape, I would personally just let them go without. Algae pellets aren't just like spinach, most have some sort of fish-based protein as their first ingredient(s). I'm looking at my Spectrum wafers right now and algae meal is the fifth ingredient in, after three fish proteins and wheat flour. I don't know if its proteins or dry foods that bother your guy more, but I don't think that algae wafers are likely to solve your problem.

I don't trust automatic feeders and I don't trust any friend that isn't also a hobbyist. Your goldfish will suffer much more if their water goes bad than they will if they miss some meals. Plus, not feeding will help the water quality from decreasing as quickly as normal, not to mention the obvious risk here of floaty fish.

If you are really worried about them, I would go with Shawnee's suggestion and toss in some duckweed. If they are that hungry, they will eat that and maybe the anacharis, and that would probably be best, being fresh (and, in the meantime, cleaning the water)

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I had a sick betta refuse food for two months and he rebounded just fine. If your goldies are in good shape, I would personally just let them go without. Algae pellets aren't just like spinach, most have some sort of fish-based protein as their first ingredient(s). I'm looking at my Spectrum wafers right now and algae meal is the fifth ingredient in, after three fish proteins and wheat flour. I don't know if its proteins or dry foods that bother your guy more, but I don't think that algae wafers are likely to solve your problem.

I don't trust automatic feeders and I don't trust any friend that isn't also a hobbyist. Your goldfish will suffer much more if their water goes bad than they will if they miss some meals. Plus, not feeding will help the water quality from decreasing as quickly as normal, not to mention the obvious risk here of floaty fish.

If you are really worried about them, I would go with Shawnee's suggestion and toss in some duckweed. If they are that hungry, they will eat that and maybe the anacharis, and that would probably be best, being fresh (and, in the meantime, cleaning the water)

I'm sorry, but I would be very careful to refrain from suggesting to anyone else that they can stop feeding fish for a month. It might be something that happened with your betta, but this is not the norm. Also, I don't think that you have to be a hobbyist to be trustworthy of these tasks. You just have to be a responsible person who is willing to do exactly as was asked.

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To be fair, I certainly did not stop feeding the fish, he refused food. He had a pretty nasty infection.

I would never recommend that someone stop feeding their fish that long, but 12 days is really not going to be an issue. Not because of food, anyway, whereas a malfunctioning automatic feeder or a friend who thinks the fish "look sad" because they only got a little pinch of food (or brings their kid who dumps a whole container of food when no one is looking) can and will kill fish. Not feeding for almost two weeks isn't ideal, certainly, but it is the lesser of to evils, in my opinion.

Maybe I'm being paranoid about well-meaning friends, but in my time on forums and working in a pet store, I have heard these stories over and over again.

[eta] This also isn't a fish in rehab or a baby that would need constant feedings for simple survival, but it is a somewhat special needs fish due to its float tendency, so I personally wouldn't be willing to risk feeding it an commercial diet that I and this fish are unfamiliar with. A sudden change in diet like that seems as likely to cause float than to not.

Edited by ratfishes

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To be fair, I certainly did not stop feeding the fish, he refused food. He had a pretty nasty infection.

I would never recommend that someone stop feeding their fish that long, but 12 days is really not going to be an issue. Not because of food, anyway, whereas a malfunctioning automatic feeder or a friend who thinks the fish "look sad" because they only got a little pinch of food (or brings their kid who dumps a whole container of food when no one is looking) can and will kill fish. Not feeding for almost two weeks isn't ideal, certainly, but it is the lesser of to evils, in my opinion.

Maybe I'm being paranoid about well-meaning friends, but in my time on forums and working in a pet store, I have heard these stories over and over again.

[eta] This also isn't a fish in rehab or a baby that would need constant feedings for simple survival, but it is a somewhat special needs fish due to its float tendency, so I personally wouldn't be willing to risk feeding it an commercial diet that I and this fish are unfamiliar with. A sudden change in diet like that seems as likely to cause float than to not.

I cannot speak for any other type of fish, but at least according to Dr. Erik Johnson, who co-authored the Fancy Goldfish book, goldfish should not go for longer than five days without feeding. I surmise that while they can probably go longer than that, they are likely to go into starvation mode and shutting down various components of their system, including the immune system. This will predispose them to infections. Moreover, while cycle bacteria are generally considered hardy, a month without food for them may be pushing it, and you may find yourself in an even worse place, since now you alos have to deal with a crashed nitrogen cycle.

Personally, I also do not trust any automated feeders, but the F14 comes very well recommended by certain members of this forum. I have asked my cousin and other relatives to feed my fish while I've been away, and everytime, this happened without incident. While I'm sure that there is a dearth of overzealous fish feeders out there, I also would like to point out that negative/horror stories tend to stick with us longer. Unfortunately, we don't tend to hear success stories about how our fish helpers did a fantastic job. Certainly, we aren't as likely to run to our favorite forum to heap praises. Also, I intend no offense, but feeding fish is not rocket science that requires an advanced degree.

Johnson & Hess had a really reasonable suggestion, and it's one that's also been recommended by many here. Pre-allocate the amount of food in a small bag(s). Then, only leave those bags and no other foods accessible. Ask your helper to feed at whatever frequency you want (J&H suggested once every 5 days). Done! :)

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We use Tetra Fin Gold Series. They soak water well in just under a minute. So, much water will be soaked by the time they are feeding. You can try it.

But I strongly recommend someone like your neighbour who can feed your fish and see if the equipments are running properly. If a canister filter or your tank leaks, then your fish will be in trouble.

If you find that finding someone is not possible, I may recommend you to use two auto feeders, lest one fails. And may I also recommend using an internal filter instead of an external filter, to minimize the chance of external filter leakage?

But I never recommend leaving your fish tank unattended for such a long time. After all, they are living beings and if a catastrophe happens, you can't really forgive yourself.

Edited by bagho

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tetra fin plus flakes and freeze dried blood worms will cause floats....

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tetra fin plus flakes and freeze dried blood worms will cause floats....

I'm not having any issue really with any of these foods as long as I give veggies along each meal, I forgot why that is?

I was going to buy some peas, did you guys say to remove the skin off the pea or can it be cut and used as is? I keep a little baggie of cut up zucchini now in my fridge but maybe a variety would be good.

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Since those foods have been squeezed of all the moister once it hits the tummy it will absorb all the water, causing the fish to loose there balance :o

With Peas you need to take the skin off. :thumb: You might be thinking of Green beans, those you dont have to take them out of the shell if they been cooked :thumb:

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Peas are fun to feed though. Pop one side open with your thumbnail and give 'em a squeeze!

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Peas are fun to feed though. Pop one side open with your thumbnail and give 'em a squeeze!

xD I agree,they are fun! Except when you squeeze to hard and have the pea go flying....

I cook mine in the microwave,and if I haven't de-shelled them before zapping,sometimes they pop like popcorn.

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Since I hate peas, we don't really stock this in the house. However, I love spinach and green beans, and so I am more than happy to get these for my fish :D

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Peas are fun to feed though. Pop one side open with your thumbnail and give 'em a squeeze!

xD I agree,they are fun! Except when you squeeze to hard and have the pea go flying....

I cook mine in the microwave,and if I haven't de-shelled them before zapping,sometimes they pop like popcorn.

I boil some water in the microwave and just toss them in the hot water for a few minutes, before straining them out. That usually does the trick.

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