Jump to content

JohnF

Regular Member
  • Posts

    55
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by JohnF

  1. how many days does it takes for de eggs 2 hatch??

    Temperature plays an important factor. Usually, at temps between 20 - 24 deg. C., it will take about 2 days.

    Shortly before hatching, the embryo makes violent movements inside the egg shell. These movements, aided by an enzyme which softens the shell, enables the fry to break free. The tail emerges from the egg shell, followed by the head. The most prominent feature is the yolk sac.

    The fry hang by a stcky secretion to any firm surface; during this period the yolk sac is consumed. After about another 2 days the fry will manage to struggle to the surface and the tiny air bladder will become inflated. From that stage the fry become free-swimming and will begin their hunt for food.

  2. Hmmm....

    Incidentally everyone has a heart and all of us who house fish or other pets do this out of love. I totally agree with what Daryl stated and I always point out that "you have to be cruel to be kind". How many breeders tried to raise a numerous batch and did not even manage to raise a single "good" specimen? Culling could be a sad word in every goldfish breeder dictionery. But this is the only word that can lead to great specimens and ensures that we lead top quality fish for ourselves and for the trade.

  3. Thanks Shamu.

    I do not intend to house koi forever in this tank. I have got ponds for such. But showing some small tategoi would be interesting.

    This tank will be a public exhibit, mainly for school children and its purpose is educational.

    My concern is equipment. At home I usually go for diy, but this time I have "some budgeted spending money" :) and intend to go for the best efficient system.

    Any suggestions on pumps, filters, UV's, etc?

  4. Hi all,

    I am thinking of setting a large display aquarium - 5500 litres. This coldwater setup will be mainly for goldfish and a few butterfly koi.

    Any suggestions on:

    1. The best filtration system, including pumps, media, etc

    2. Lighting

    3. UV Sterilizer

    4. Other equipment

    Thanks.

  5. A 1000+ shubunkin brood is now about 3 months old; most fry have now exceeded 1".

    5% look very very promising and have been put in a seperate quarters for top attention.

    20% reverted to steel grey colour.

    20% have 'lack shape perfection' and will be humainly discarded.

    Most of the rest have all positive qualities, including early colour with beautiful patches and good body shape, but are pink gills; some on one side, others on both.

    Most of you have a heart for all specimens, but sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind and upgrade your stock quality. Should these be discarded?

    Thanks.

  6. Nice specimens Sushi67 :)

    I also house shrimps - Cherries, CRS, Bumble-bees and Blacks and all are very prolific. Personally I would remove the Apple snail since it eats plants :( Some nice red Ramshorns would be more appropriate; just control their population!

    Well done ;)

  7. Here is another pic of this setup -

    planted1stapril.jpg

    The foreground plant is not Glosso (although there is some Glosso on the sides); it is a rare local plant - Elatine gussonei. Its natural habitat are shallow rockpools; forms a pretty dense carpet (green highlighter shade) in winter and dies out in summer when the pools dry out. A friend of mine has managed to keep this plant submersed for over a year. The greatest challenge is to provide low temperature. Here in Malta temperatures shoot up the scale in summer :cry1

    28jan6a.jpg

    This is submersed Riccia. Looks pretty when pearling although requires constant attention.

    riccia2.jpg

  8. Hi rock4life and good luck with your new tank :)

    I have been keeping goldfish and a hundred other species for the past 40 years +. My honest answer is to keep goldfish, goldfish and goldfish with goldfish. There are scores of different types of goldfish available nowadays, each with unique features and characteristics.

    I believe that most of the members of this forum are of the same opinion. If you prefer a variety of species go for a coolwater community and if you still wish to include goldfish, consider the hardy single-tails.

    Good luck!

  9. :thanks

    In the first 3 months I had some thread algae which had to be removed manually with alot of patience. This problem diminished when I added a trio (1 male & 2 females) of American Flagfish (Jordinella floridae); they consumed the algae that was present in no time.

    J. floridae is said to withstand temperatures between 18 ? 25 deg. C. It is rather important that tank mates should be fast; no slow moving fish or long finned varieties as the Flagfish may decide to add a few fins to its daily menu! I can say that they did an excellent job with algae and till now they don?t seem to bother the mosses or any other particular plant.

    Here is a pic of java moss attached to bogwood. This was once a host and keeper of lots of unwanted threads.

    javamossa.jpg

  10. Hi all :rolleyes:

    Although I am a sick on goldfish , housing ryukins and shubies, I love coolwater aquascaping. Here is a pic of one of my tanks. Please feel free to comment ;)

    To be honest, my favourite setups are Iwagumi. Maybe I have been living too much with goldfish and so am more inclined to the beauty of the Japanese garden. On the other hand, a Dutch planted aquarium can be compared to the beautiful fields of tulips.

    In this planted setup, I have tried to compromise between the two styles. At the moment I am experimenting with some semi-hardy plants, although my favourites remain mosses and liverworts.

    This unheated tank has a net water volume of approximately 80 litres and now is 6 months mature.

    maypic11b.jpg

    Here are my setup specs:

    HARDWARE:

    Tank dimensions - 120cm x 35 x 35

    Lighting - 1 x Philips Standard Daylight F36W/54

    1 x Arcadia Orig. Tropical F036 - 48"

    Filtration - PF 700 l/hr

    Base Fertiliser - Aquamedic's Volcanit

    Additional gravel - Fine sand topping for f/ground plants

    CO2 - Yeast generated DIY w/ Aquamedic 100 diffuser

    WATER PARAMETERS:

    Present Temp - Max 18 deg C; Min 15 deg C.

    pH - 7.0

    GH - 5 dGH

    FAUNA:

    Tanichthys albonubes

    Xiphophorus variatus

    Jordinella floridae

    Xenotoca eiseni

    Amano Shrimps

    Ramshorn Snails

    FLORA:

    Vallisneria americana

    Hydrophila polysperma Rosanervig

    Cryptocoryne parviflorus

    Cryptocoryne wendtii

    Cryptocoryne undulata

    Hydrocotyle verticillata

    Hydrocotyle leucocephala

    Bacopa monnieri

    Anubias nana

    Ludwigia repens x arcuata

    Aponogeton undulata

    Sagittaria subulata

    Samolus valerandi

    Echinodorus tenellus

    Heteranthera zosterifolia

    Marsilea hirsuta

    Java moss

    Taiwan moss

    Willow moss

    Christmas moss

    Flame moss

    Monoselenium tenerum

    Riccia fluitans

    Glossostigma elatinoides

    Elatine gussonei

    ROUTINE:

    Lights for 10 hrs daily

    Liquid fert. every week - 10cc

    Fortnightly 20% water change

  11. Thanks for your immediate replies.

    We don't have any racoons in Malta (Europe). The only predators are people :D . Regarding climate - worst winters fall to about 18 deg. C for some weeks (if not days), and summers are quite hot - over 35 deg. C from June to October sometimes over 40! Snow and ice are only found in the dictionery :) .

    I was thinking of wet areas about 12" deep filled with a mixture of gravel and soil. The water level would be 1" or 2" above the substrate. Plants 2 - 4ft tall would be ideal. I know that flowering will take place in season, but the area would look nice if these plants are evergreen.

  12. Hi All,

    I am constructing a large water feature with an area of about 1000 sq.m and intend to create some low wet areas, about 50cm deep to plant some evergreen flowering plants. The place gets full sun. I was thinking some types of irises. Any suggestions will surely be appreciated :)

  13. He was actually bleaching it to make the markings 'better'. That is the only part i dont like.

    At least he was gentle enough to use a brush. Not to mention the new trend of injecting or "juicing" goldfish! They use Induline, Nigrosine, and Benzinide dyes which are commonly used in printers. In fact, the injection process is alleged to cause high mortalities. Over 40% of painted fish suffer from lymphocystis virus. This disease manifests itself as small whitish growths on the fish's body and fins. The stress of being injected with dye also lowers the fish's natural immunity. Histopathological investigations revealed lesions that included microgranulomas in the kidney, severe hepatocellular vacuolar change and degeneration. :cry1 Bugge*s are selling dyed goldfish under the name of "Jellybean goldfish". This practice should be stopped! (Sorry for being out of subject).

  14. [

    Hey John,

    It's an interesting one. Where do you buy it? I don't see it on amazon or google?

    A friend bought them for me while visiting Aquarama 2005 (9th International Aquarium Fish & Accessories Exhibition & Conference) in Singapore.

×
×
  • Create New...