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Trinket

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  1. Awesome stuff and great help. Caitie, great to see you here with the worm XP. She is up and about! This is HEALING time. Johnny you are doing GREAT with her!! What a cute fish. I would like to recommend you take all the gravel out slowly. No need to QT a fish who has swallowed a load of worms and has a cyst like this. I am glad the poop is a better color now as that sounded like blood, the black part. She is a fighting little soul and has agreat owner she is going to make it. Do think about getting rid of the gravel. At least until this whole epsidoe is long over.The colored gravel especially can leech toxins and if you have planaria-even one- you can guarantee they are breeding under the gravel and this could repeat. The reason for the square shape was from bottom sitting. Much more comfortable on bare bottom and easier on a cyst or prolapsed organ. How is she eating her meds now and how was the latest poop?
  2. Female fish can be quite small in size when they start spraying eggs. And some male fish are capable of fertilizing those eggs from around 9 months old. The female can also release eggs with no males present yes.
  3. Sounds good. You'll probably need a heater to keep the temp out there constant. I agree on the GW if you possibly can cultivate some. It is such a great start in life for fancy fishes' delicate swim bladders. Changing water before the fry are 4 weeks old was always a huge challenge for me as their backs can get bent easily with a sudden rough wave and it has to be done so slowly and carefully before the skeleton hardens up and the fry is stronger after about 4-5 weeks. Yes it has to be done but obviously water in a larger space will stay fresher longer and accumulate less waste than a smaller water volume.
  4. Hello Andra. Welcome to kokos Have you ever cut wen before? It's a fatty tissue and it is quite different from the lump here I think. IMO, this lump looks like a viral growth and you can see the blood vessels running through it. If you cut it, like you can wen, I think there might be quite a lot of blood and a high risk of infection. I'm going to move your thread to the diagnosis and discussion forum as there are people over there that will help you talk this through some more There is also a white box there (above your first post) with a list of questions to answer (like you woudl at the docs) just so we can get a good picture of your set up, water and the fishes behavior
  5. Trinket

    Gravel

    Gravel How can gravel be both good and bad? Deciding whether you want gravel or not :Some things to consider: Anaerobic bacteria living deep under gravel breathe/respirate gases like nitrates, sulfate, and carbon dioxide in an electron transport chain process, and these gases build up over time. These gases collect under all (deeper than 2cm) gravel. Anaerobic bacteria lack the enzyme to convert oxygen into a viable form so they hate the higher level, oxygenated places. When we disturb the gravel these gases that they are using are released back into the aquarium. This is one possibility for gravel disturbance followed by sudden floaty fish. Anaerobic bacteria that live under gravel hate oxygen, they literally live in fear of it because it causes their death. By churning the gravel vigorously we expose many of these bacteria to oxygen and they die. They release gases as they die too. These are the twin processes of sulfate reduction and bacterial fermentation. While alive these bacteria can however play a small role in absorbing nitrates and nitric compounds. The surface of gravel also houses aerobic beneficial bacteria who attach to the surface stones and assist with the nitrogen cycle by converting ammonia and nitrites to nitrates. About Anaerobic bacteria: 1. Hundreds of thousands of bacteria live in a space the size of the period at the end of this sentence . 2. Bacteria have an average life span of only 20 minutes. This means that during this time every single bacterium must replicate/reproduce every minute. In that gravel there are probably trillions of millions of billions. Each one reproducing by cell transfer and binary fission- trillions and millions more every second. 3. When they reproduce, each one reproduces the amount of bacteria the size of a sugar lump. Some of them are motile, they move up through the water. Most like the dark recesses of deep gravel. Its ideal for breeding. Dark, wet and undisturbed. Beneficial aerobic bacteria live in the very top 2cms of the gravel bed.. the maximum amount of gravel that can hold beneficial bacteria is 1/4 of an inch. As said above, these gravel surface bacteria assist with the nitrogen cycle by converting harmful ammonia and nitrite to nitrate. The bacteria deeper down then utilize the end product nitrates. EVERY bacterium and larval parasitic form beneath that top layer is potentially a bad one. Bacteria that cause ulcer disease for example and parasites like flukes that sink in under stones and can stay encysted for some time completely untouched by meds under gravel. What happens when they run out of their supply of respiratory gases? It sometimes happens that the anaerobic bacteria's supply of gases is used up. The fish have not been fed for some time. Or perhaps there is an algae crash etc. At this time you will smell a rotten egg smell in the tank which is the sulfate reduction process- a sort of decomposition or fermentation of the bacteria. There can even be a sprinkling of black dust visible at this point. Brown rust or "algae"...is zinc oxide a derivative of iron in the water. It isn't dangerous- just unsightly.As the water settles some of the trace elements are leached out of the water - they are then processed and can be re-assimilated by any plant or algae life. When you have gravel for the first few months you may see these deposits coloring your gravel. White gravel may look soiled. These oxides compete for oxygen with green algae and so must be removed to promote green algae (which takes about 4-6months under average lighting). Iron, manganese and some other of the trace elements are only water soluble for a short time. They oxidise in the presence of oxygen, then precipitate and are assimilated via plant matter. A perfectly balanced water will also hold the elements longer and you will rarely see zinc oxide in a well established tank that has a perfect water balance. You should find that as your water stabilises the zinc oxide will decrease. Some will be re-assimilated. Light (turning the gravel regularly) and oxygen will help your gravel stay white. To summarize: In the end, choosing to have gravel or not should be a personal aesthetic and informed choice. On the one hand while anaerobic bacteria can be an endless source of worry and disease in some tanks where aeration is low and gravel deep, for people whose source water has a low kH/gH, gravel it can be useful. It can be mixed for example with coral which releases minerals into the water that stabilize pH. The top surface area of gravel can also house quite a number of good cycling bacteria. And fish do get some exercise and fun from turning and sniffing at gravel perhaps. It also looks pretty when kept well. This post has been promoted to an article
  6. Trinket

    Gravel

    Gravel How can gravel be both good and bad? Deciding whether you want gravel or not :Some things to consider: Anaerobic bacteria living deep under gravel breathe/respirate gases like nitrates, sulfate, and carbon dioxide in an electron transport chain process, and these gases build up over time. These gases collect under all (deeper than 2cm) gravel. Anaerobic bacteria lack the enzyme to convert oxygen into a viable form so they hate the higher level, oxygenated places. When we disturb the gravel these gases that they are using are released back into the aquarium. This is one possibility for gravel disturbance followed by sudden floaty fish. Anaerobic bacteria that live under gravel hate oxygen, they literally live in fear of it because it causes their death. By churning the gravel vigorously we expose many of these bacteria to oxygen and they die. They release gases as they die too. These are the twin processes of sulfate reduction and bacterial fermentation. While alive these bacteria can however play a small role in absorbing nitrates and nitric compounds. The surface of gravel also houses aerobic beneficial bacteria who attach to the surface stones and assist with the nitrogen cycle by converting ammonia and nitrites to nitrates. About Anaerobic bacteria: 1. Hundreds of thousands of bacteria live in a space the size of the period at the end of this sentence . 2. Bacteria have an average life span of only 20 minutes. This means that during this time every single bacterium must replicate/reproduce every minute. In that gravel there are probably trillions of millions of billions. Each one reproducing by cell transfer and binary fission- trillions and millions more every second. 3. When they reproduce, each one reproduces the amount of bacteria the size of a sugar lump. Some of them are motile, they move up through the water. Most like the dark recesses of deep gravel. Its ideal for breeding. Dark, wet and undisturbed. Beneficial aerobic bacteria live in the very top 2cms of the gravel bed.. the maximum amount of gravel that can hold beneficial bacteria is 1/4 of an inch. As said above, these gravel surface bacteria assist with the nitrogen cycle by converting harmful ammonia and nitrite to nitrate. The bacteria deeper down then utilize the end product nitrates. EVERY bacterium and larval parasitic form beneath that top layer is potentially a bad one. Bacteria that cause ulcer disease for example and parasites like flukes that sink in under stones and can stay encysted for some time completely untouched by meds under gravel. What happens when they run out of their supply of respiratory gases? It sometimes happens that the anaerobic bacteria's supply of gases is used up. The fish have not been fed for some time. Or perhaps there is an algae crash etc. At this time you will smell a rotten egg smell in the tank which is the sulfate reduction process- a sort of decomposition or fermentation of the bacteria. There can even be a sprinkling of black dust visible at this point. Brown rust or "algae"...is zinc oxide a derivative of iron in the water. It isn't dangerous- just unsightly.As the water settles some of the trace elements are leached out of the water - they are then processed and can be re-assimilated by any plant or algae life. When you have gravel for the first few months you may see these deposits coloring your gravel. White gravel may look soiled. These oxides compete for oxygen with green algae and so must be removed to promote green algae (which takes about 4-6months under average lighting). Iron, manganese and some other of the trace elements are only water soluble for a short time. They oxidise in the presence of oxygen, then precipitate and are assimilated via plant matter. A perfectly balanced water will also hold the elements longer and you will rarely see zinc oxide in a well established tank that has a perfect water balance. You should find that as your water stabilises the zinc oxide will decrease. Some will be re-assimilated. Light (turning the gravel regularly) and oxygen will help your gravel stay white. To summarize: In the end, choosing to have gravel or not should be a personal aesthetic and informed choice. On the one hand while anaerobic bacteria can be an endless source of worry and disease in some tanks where aeration is low and gravel deep, for people whose source water has a low kH/gH, gravel it can be useful. It can be mixed for example with coral which releases minerals into the water that stabilize pH. The top surface area of gravel can also house quite a number of good cycling bacteria. And fish do get some exercise and fun from turning and sniffing at gravel perhaps. It also looks pretty when kept well.
  7. Just make sure the tank sides and bottom are spotless. If he is eating again even a little (great to hear!!) his immunity will be able to take care of this mild mouthrot. Keep focused on perfect water, stable conditions and encouraging him to eat. Healing takes a long time and we really have to be patient mostly
  8. I've used coral gravel as substrate for about 5 years. I have a kH of around 30 which means that my tap pH drops down from 7.5 to 6 within 24 hours without massive amounts of coral. I have Eheim cannister filters and they do not hold enough coral to keep my pH up at 8 where I like it.....the substrate does. I have a 55 and a 75 gallon tank..both with substrate coral that has lasted for years. i have never had to add a pH up at water changes and I do large ones. 80% once a week and 30% once a week. It's an awesome solution IME.
  9. And a majorly important thought! I totally missed that. If you can't transfer the cycle via adding a filter you will indeed need to be doing back to back 80% water changes morning and night minimum. Unfortunately any ammonia in the water for a fish with dropsy, will make her a lot worse And matching temperature is going to be a top priority. Any temp change will cause stress which is the trigger for (farther) dropsy. You can do it!! It just takes time and water
  10. Keep the total amount of epsom salt at no more than half a teaspoon in the tank. Anything between 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon in 10 gallons will be okay, it does not have to be mega millimeter precise. Aim for 1/4 tsp. No more than half a teaspoon total at any time. Every time you do a water change calculate back the salt you took out. So, if you do a 50% water change add back 50% of the total epsom that was in the tank before the water change. Does that make sense? It will probably take a week in QT. You shoudl start to see bloating reduce within 24-48 hrs.
  11. You can go up to 80 safely..just remember if you do have temps that high the water loses a lot of dissolved oxygen so you do need to make extra. You can do that by making splash on the water surface so more oxygen gets dissolved, or addng a few bubble wands. It really helps!
  12. Dropsy is a symptom not an actual disease. The toxic water could have caused it and with luck and excellent warmer water and epsom she may fight off the symptom and recover fine. You have caught this with just I think one popped bubble. I have had pearlscales recover from this so don't give up please You dont have to bag your fish, that would be stressful. Use a plastic jug or bowl and scoop her up in it with tank water. Very very slowly lower the bowl into the new tank of treated/Primed water making 100% sure the new water is TEMPERATURE matched and pH matched to the water she is coming out of. VERY important. Slowly slowly allow the 2 waters to mix and then lower the bowl so she can swim out. As longas the pH and temp are the same she will be fine I promise you. The reason for the bag thing is that store water has different pH and temp from a person's home water. In this case the tap water is the same A heater to very slowly raise temp is important too.
  13. What is your pH? That is the one number you have not given us and a low pH can cause this white peeling skin.
  14. Lol. Yes I think Vets do really have to be quite tough. I know I couldn't do it I did work with a vet as an assistant for a period of about 6 months on and off, it was so hard for me. I think you need to remember too, that single tail fish especially can survive quite some time without food. In ponds for example they last months..I know they have algae and so on but over wintering...I would try something like brine shrimp that floats at the top and then falls or krill....these are foods that smell very strong and attractive to fish and are easy to swallow too. They are tiny. Most important is to keep the water ammonia free as this can really put a weaker fish off his food.
  15. When you take a fish out of a tank - the beneficial bacteria die off to accomodate the reduced needs of the tank's occupants. When you replace or add a fish they then struggle to regrow...there can be acycle bump so you need to add more media/check params constantly and w/c. I think you did right to return him and the extra bubbles are very important. Darkening of skin color can be due to lack of dissolved oxygen, those disinfectant meds (which also by the way should work on columnaris) really do use up the oxygen in the water because they are oxidants. That is how they work. He needs sustained time in stable, familiar comfort zone. Massive aeration. And a strong cycle. I'm not sure why he isn't eating, the black in his throat could just be the picture or possibly a staining after effect of the meds.
  16. Looking much better . I would say the skin issues are cured. The spot on his mouth could be something different that has not responded to this treatment however. I'm a little concerned he is "chewing" as fish can do that when they have some growths inside their mouths. However it could also be a reaction and dislike of the taste of the medication in the water. All meds have a taste and it is never pleasant. Let's see how he is in the main tank. You may still need to do a mouth swab with HP but let's see if he will eat again in the main tank first on Thursday. Hopefully he will and if he does, you may not need to do that swab at all
  17. Hi tithra and Alex! Quickly checking in from work. Yes that fish food is the exact same ingredients and exact same percentage of them as the old Jungle AP. I would order right away. Doesn't sound like service is good there though, I have no idea about that side I'm afraid! Maybe this time will be faster! Sent from my iphone.
  18. He is absolutely gorgeous. Such a beauty, with a winning little face and expression The poop sounds abnormal. And that length of bottom sitting a little over normal ratio even for orandas who take first place in "possibly nothing wrong at all, my head is heavy today" kind of bottom sitting. Just to add to the food discussion.The main ingredient of MetroMeds is krill. It really bulks fish up and they just cannot resist the smell. It is addictive. I think one of the reasons MMs has had so much success has been because of this fact. Antibiotics often taste bitter and very few medicatons have managed to cover that taste and smell as well as MMs have. However a continued diet of MMs is not good!!! As we all know. I would feed him fresh krill on accasion . I feed saki hikari probiotic food purple pack and I have zero floaters and my fish go crazy for the stuff. Others on here at kokos have not liked this food. Finding what suits your fish takes some time. And everyone has different opinions on the matter. Progold for example had my fish floating immediately so I strongly believe we really do have to try out a variety and see what works best for our own fish I wonder since he is eating well, if the next step might be the internal parasite food med by AP. Have you ever used those on him?
  19. Kayla, I think you are on track. I don't know that the meds are going to completely cure every speck of this. His immunity can once the worst has gone. It does seem there has been some improvemnt. I do not think it's a problem returning him since all your fish have been exposed to this already. It's too late to stop that. However, dermal diseases are not usually caught by fish with a strong immune response. The purpose of isolation to medicate was to avoid medicating your main tank and therefore crash your cycle for sure (as these meds always do). I agree he should eat and will when he is not stressed- aka, back in his home. I think you should continue till Thursday as you are on track to do, and return him then.
  20. Okay. I think you are doing your best for him! The Green meds are a bit nasty as they do stain. You should wear gloves to dispose of it outside in the yard. It's a chemical like a disinfectant~ actually a copper based dye . It kills quite a few bacteria and funguses ~ it could also be flushed in the bathroom safely Yes that is exactly what happens, the sore areas pick up the green and look bright for a while. The meds should "attach" like that. If he starts to bottom sit, the meds have gotten too strong...you need to observe him. He should be okay..usually fish will bottom sit immediately if the meds are too strong for them. Medication should not really affect the ammonia reading. It can affect pH however. I suspect he is actually releasing quite a bit of ammonia under stress + food will release a little if left too. Hoping for updates and better news. Hang in there Smokey. You are a tough fish and treatment will soon be over
  21. I fed them cucumber when algae was low. i stuck a huge cut piece on a suction clip and the babies would go crazy for it. They suck off the green skin, that's their fave part I could leave it in overnight or a few days wthout affecting params too. They do need to graze-feed 24/7.
  22. I feel for you Your water has virtually no mineral content . I would keep checking tap pH too as that is unusually low for a regular tap pH. I hope between you and koko and Alex you can get this sorted. I use coral gravel as a direct substrate (masses of it) to raise my mineral content. It's something to think about along with the Buff It Up. Whatever it takes.
  23. Do you have algae on the tankw alls? Lots of hidey places? Any goldies in there with them. I did have a few eaten when they lived together. One batch should be about 20 plus fry. And very often once they start breeding they will do so several times so you may see fry of all different sizes. That one for example looks several weeks old already. The Dad may be hovering over a new batch right now
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