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fish10

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Posts posted by fish10

  1. 5 minutes ago, koko said:

    Oh he's looking quite cute in his new outfit. I like it. I wonder if he will keep some of the orange. 

    Oh yes, he's quite dapper now. Very formal. 🤵♂️😂 

    No sign of the orange fade slowing down yet... We shall see! 🤷

    Would love to see any color change pictures anyone has. 🙂

  2. On 4/22/2021 at 2:15 AM, FishyMandy said:

    I had a fish that had really bright orange for years and then within a couple of weeks his orange completely faded and he ended up completely white, he's never gained back any of his orange.

    I had no idea this was possible until now! 🤷

    He was cute when he was orange with a white belly, and he's cute now too. ♥️ I just didn't realize how fast it would happen! He may be completely white soon. Here he is today. 

    PXL_20210430_235109611.jpg

  3. On 4/9/2021 at 7:43 PM, koko said:

    Poor fish :( 

    He's loving life now! 🙂

    Here's a current pic (right) compared to five days ago (left). At this rate he'll be completely white soon! 😯 Will he ever get his orange back? Just curious. 

    PhotoCollage_20210421_210814141.jpg

  4. 17 hours ago, Mikey said:

    If you look at his tail, there is actually more orange on it now than when you first got him :teehee  

    That's true - he started to lose some of the orange on his tail, then got a few orange streaks at the end. Guess I'll wait and see what else happens! 🙂

    Thanks for the insight. I was curious because our other fish hasn't changed color at all. 🤷

  5. We've had this little guy almost a year. Will he eventually lose all his orange? He used to be 2/3 orange and 1/3 white (left: July 2020), which has reversed over the past few months (right: currently).

    It doesn't matter to me either way, just curious?

    PhotoCollage_20210405_221258476.jpg

  6. Update... we've got crystal clear water again! And that's without the weekly water change yet. :) I was definitely over feeding. When people told me they would "act hungry" all the time, they weren't kidding. :feedme

    Also... The airline tubing works beautifully to clear out debris on sand. I didn't think there would be enough suction - so glad you recommended it, thanks! 

    Now, if I could only stop the algae buildup in the filter tubing... Ah well, I may just have to live with it. As you mentioned, it's probably a good thing. 

    Arctic Mama - is there media you add in place of the carbon? 

    PXL_20201009_125203961.jpg

  7. 11 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

    Filter maintenance, I basically do it when my fish show symptoms of nitrates, usually some bottom sitting, or when they get above 10 ppms. In my tank that’s usually every 6-8 weeks, I just knock my filter pads against the change bucket to shake off most of the mulm and give them a few good squeezes in the water, then call it good. 

    Ok - I'm probably cleaning more frequently than I should! 

    13 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

    For siphoning poo, I actually like just using a little air line tubing so I can get right in there it has strong suction but a narrow tube, so it’s easy to zero in on the poo and not take in a ton of sand.

    What do you use to create the suction? Can you manually create enough suction with gravity and air line tubing to draw out debris? Tomorrow is water change day... :)

  8. 47 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

    Oh you’re soaking? Did the cloudy water start before or after that? The reason I ask is because soaked pellets often give off more sediment in the water (because they’re already softened to falling apart) than dry, and those could conceivably be causing some of the water quality issues too.

    I only started soaking them about a week ago, and noticed the cloudiness a few days ago...so it could be the culprit? 

    I read somewhere that soaking them helps with digestion and prevents swim bladder disease. However, they were doing just fine on dry pellets for a month...gobbled them up either way. Any insight on whether it's necessary to soak them? The info on the label doesn't say anything about soaking, so...? :idont

    Either way, I'll reduce the amount I'm feeding and see how it impacts the cloudiness. 

    How often do you typically rinse out the media in your filter?

    54 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

    For siphoning poo, I actually like just using a little air line tubing so I can get right in there it has strong suction but a narrow tube, so it’s easy to zero in on the poo and not take in a ton of sand. Some getting removed is normal though and you can either spoon it back into the tank after it siphoning or toss it.

    Genius idea. I hadn't thought of doing this. I will try it. 

    Thanks!

     

  9. 1 hour ago, Arctic Mama said:

    My guess is that something in the gel or possibly pellets is being excreted and not well digested, so even though they’re eating, the waste is still leaving too much to break down in system (almost like having excess uneaten food, effectively). Try cutting the feed volume in half for two weeks and do nothing but your normal water changes, see if that clears it at all. Don’t disturb the substrate or filters, but do siphon out any poo piles you find that aren’t getting shuttled well into the filters. 

    Thanks so much for the information! It may be hard to tell, but in the picture there is some cloudiness (not a lot).

    I had not considered that even though they were eating the pellets quickly, perhaps they weren't being digested well. I will decrease the food volume and see what happens. So 10 pellets per day for 2 fish is enough? 

    One thing I have started doing recently was soaking the pellets before feeding, for easier digestion. Is that recommended? 

    Question about siphoning - The python works great for water changes. However, I am not getting enough suction to actually "vacuum" out any poo sitting on top of the sand. If I place the Python right on top of the sand with debris, the debris will float up a bit but not actually get vacuumed out. Do I have a problem with the suction power? I was thinking it would be more powerful. 

    1 hour ago, Arctic Mama said:

    Also, do leave algae on any surfaces you can, at least rocks and plants if it isn’t excessive. I find having a good algae population makes for better water quality, more waste consuming and nitrogen fixing activity is always better!

    Ok, got it. I was cleaning the brown algae completely off the rocks (and as best as I could off the plants) at each water change. I'll try leaving it there, but won't it negatively impact the plants by blocking light? I'll still probably clean the algae off the sides of the tank so we have a clear view of their cuteness. :)  I haven't noticed them eating the algae like others have commented. 

    You can see the algae build up on the driftwood, rocks, airline and at the base of the tank above the sand. Also - the tubes for the intake/outflow pipes develop a lot of brown algae after about a week! Normal?

    I really appreciate the insight! I want to make sure these little "water piggies" are happy...

    IMG_20201001_093904.jpg

  10. Wondering if there's a cause/solution for cloudy water that has begun recently? It's not horribly cloudy, but up until this point, the water has been crystal clear.

    I started a fishless cycle about 3 months ago, then added two fantails (have been in the tank for 2 months). Details: 35 gal tank, Fluval 307 canister filter, two air stones, poppy pipe for extra surface agitation, live plants (java fern, anubias, moss balls), weekly 80-90% water changes with Prime, readings have consistently been fine once the cycle finished (pH 7.5-8.5, Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitrate <5).

    I feed them once a day (15-20 sinking pellets, which they eat within a few minutes - is that too much?). A couple times a week I've given them shelled peas. I also have gel food to start working into their diet, but want to fix the cloudy issue first. Since adding the fish, there has been brown algae build up each week. I wipe it clean every couple days and do a thorough cleaning of all the plants, rocks, etc at each water change. I guess that's another issue of whether the algae can be better controlled, but the tank does have indirect sunlight exposure so I may need to live with it. 

    At the most recent water change I replaced the carbon and quick-clear water polishing pads in the filter. All other media was rinsed in tank water as usual. 

    Thanks for any insight! 

  11. 15 hours ago, J.Allen said:

    Whatttttttttt that is awesome and I had no idea that this is how this was done. I also dove right into the planted tank even though my local fish store guy told me that it could not be done with goldfish. The plants are an important part of my filtration.

    Same here - I was told goldfish would eat everything and it wasn't advised to have a planted tank, but I decided to give it a shot anyway for filtration reasons, and an added challenge. For about a month the plants were the only thing I had to look at anyway while the tank was cycling. They've nibbled on the moss balls a bit, but nothing drastic. But that may change as they get older? It's great that you've tried different things! Goldfish need enrichment too. :) I was also thinking the same though - to keep it simple so it's easy to maintain and keep clean. I've had some challenge with brown algae so far but it's getting better I think. That piece of driftwood you have looks great!

    I am a plant novice, but from what I've read, Java Fern won't grow well in substrate - it needs something to "cling" to. I used sterilized surgical thread because I had it on hand, and it works well so far to adhere to rocks. Maybe someone else with more experience can offer more advice (I think there's a "planted tank" section in this forum too?). 

  12. 10 hours ago, J.Allen said:

     I am also surprised by them quite frequently. This is really the first time I personally have ever kept fish and been directly responsible for their well being. I did bad at the very beginning with over feeding and things like that but I have now made adjustments and I think I have it dialed in. I don't know other peoples thoughts on this but I believe they are sentient, they seem to know who I am , what time it is (they don't use clocks as much as their memories of food), I swear sometimes at night I catch them watching TV if its on. They will play with my hands through the glass and if ever I need to reach in the tank they do not fear me. Some people might think its hokey pokey , but I often place my hand on the glass and tell them that I love them aloud because if they are aware of what's going on they can certainly hear and feel the vibrations in my home and water is an excellent conductor.

    Originally I was seeking to get a cat, but due all kinds of factors, that didn't seem like the best fit for me in life right now. This whole project , from first having the interest in goldfish and doing all the reading, to building my own tank stand, scouring offer up and let go for parts and tanks,  resealing sumps, etc has proven to be a fantastic creative outlet for me and has put me on the path to some kind of healing.

    I became freshly jobless June 1 of this year - to make matters worse it didn't end well, someone asked me to do something very wrong and I blew the whistle and got the clap back - demoted , transferred, and tortured until I resigned despite having excellent yearly evaluations, the hearts of my coworkers and our customers. I now have to fight for justice, all the while, being blocked from getting a job in my same industry OR collecting any of the funds allotted to help Americans that are unemployed. It was probably one of those pivotal points in my life, I was part of corporate America -I knew it was bad when I was there- but I didn't realize how much I had lost myself and it was sucking the life out of me until I was no longer in the situation. I still don't know exactly what Im going to do but ever since I have accepted the responsibility of these fish well being and I have become a man of service, while I feel uncertain and empty -my mind is unfettered and it seems as though when I need them, now the answers can come right in.

    Sounds like you've had some meaningful life moments recently! Glad the fish can provide some mental clarity. I agree - it is a joy to care for them and they provide more interaction than I anticipated. I am used to having dogs (our current Whippet has no interest in the goldfish), so I was surprised with how engaging the fish can be while living in their own realm. They frequently "chase" me back and forth when I'm on different ends of the tank, swim right up to my face, and they are quite used to my hand in the tank (they often give me "fish kisses" as I rearrange and clean). I love having them. 

    You are not the only one to make mistakes early on. I am still learning as I go. There's definitely a learning curve but we do the best we can. I decided to dive right in with an attempt at a planted tank, and part of the result is the cups you asked about. I started with some Java Fern and Anubias, secured to driftwood or rocks. I'm hoping they will grow taller to hide the intake/outflow pipes more and give the fish more "cover" to swim between. The Java Fern has sprouted quite a bit so I've been replanting some of it in the glass cups. I thought it might give them something to explore other than the sand. Jelly Bean LOVES to swim in and out of the cups, picking at whatever is inside. Lydia, not so much. I've actually seen Jelly Bean swim away with half of a green pea and bury it behind a rock in one of the cups (I think to keep it safe from Lydia). It was gone 10 minutes later. 

    IMG_20200920_134634.jpg

    IMG_20200920_231028.jpg

  13. 10 hours ago, J.Allen said:

    I have only had Magikarp for about three months - Im not sure about the He or She myself, based on the rear anatomy I think Male, but still hard for me to tell. Magikarp also has a slightly less bulbous belly than my other telescope Goldeen ( I've got a Pokemon theme going) in a side by side comparison.  I believe these fish are all relatively about one year old, maybe at the most going on two. I have three of them, two telescope and a Thai Oranda, they range from 5.5 inches to 6.5 inches.

    Sounds like a fun trio! I've been surprised at how playful they are, but then again it's been decades since I've had goldfish so I'm learning all over again. 

  14. 7 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

    Water looks good, goldfish have very unstable coloration throughout it their lives, so based on what you’re explaining I’d assume it is either a color change naturally or there was some mechanical damage to the tail, like getting stuck to a filter or nibbled on, and it’s healing. Could be either, neither is worrisome :)

    This is a relief, thanks for the insight Arctic Mama! I'll assume it may be a nibbled/injured tail at worst and a natural color change at best. :)

    I'll certainly keep an eye on it (no change since yesterday), but as I mentioned in the previous post, she has been acting 100% normal. So that is good!

  15. 8 hours ago, J.Allen said:

    It's my belief that just like people fish are all unique. I would not be surprised if , just how humans can have a single gray hair, fish can have a single stray mark as long as it doesn't accompany any damaged flesh or behavioral changes.

    ^^ This is what I'm hoping J.Allen - that it's simply a "normal anomaly". Thanks for the response, it makes a lot of sense. 

    You bring up a good point - I should have mentioned that her behavior/demeanor has not changed at all. She's just as enthusiastic to see me as always when I approach the tank, eating well as usual, and swimming happily. 

    Magikarp is beautiful - do you mind if I ask how old s/he is?

  16. These little guys have grown quickly, so I expected some change in coloration. Jelly Bean's tail used to be completely white, but now it has an orange streak (not concerning). 

    However, yesterday I noticed a black mark on Lydia's tail. It didn't make sense to me that it could be an ammonia burn... the tank went through ~36 day fishless cycle, then I monitored the levels daily for a couple weeks after adding the fish. I measured levels weekly after that, with ammonia never reading above 0. Weekly 80-90% water changes. They've been in the tank for about a month and a half. 

    As soon as I noticed her tail yesterday, I checked levels, and then did a big water change just to be safe, and added prime (see pic - all levels look good?). 

    I've had some brown algae issues as the tank gets established, but that's it so far.

    Any thoughts on what could be happening with her tail?

    IMG_20200919_104308.jpg

    PhotoCollage_20200919_104528560.jpg

  17. 23 minutes ago, koko said:

    How is everything going now? Sure is a very nice tank 😁

    It's going really well! The water parameters have been stable. And I can't believe how fast they've grown in such a short amount of time! 

    One still seems to "bully" the other during feeding time - aggressively chasing him away from the food. But not sure there's much I can do about that. 

    Overall they are so much fun!

    IMG_20200825_162720.jpg

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