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wve

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  1. I've found a group of beautiful demekins for sale but wondered which ones you guys thought were the best quality. I like the look of the red and black one and the red and white one with the strange asymmetric markings. I'm planning on buying three though so I'm not sure about the third one. If you could pick three of these fish, which ones would you choose? Sorry about the picture quality. They are all screenshots of a video on Facebook. [url=http://s1303.photobucket.com/user/Welland_Valley_Exotics/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2015-02/31BC60B6-B1BC-4650-A394-DFA5E77543C0_zps7idlcs9k.png.html]
  2. I have recently been experiencing odour problems with my 50 gallon goldfish tank. I have never really had such problems with my other tanks, it just seems to be this one. I am aware that fish tanks should have a somewhat organic smell when you get really close to the water, however, if left open, this tank would easily stink out the whole room. From my experience, this doesn't seem right [emoji51][emoji51] The tank is stocked with three fish, one five inch oranda and two butterfly telescopes one is 5" and the other is about 3.5-4". I am aware that the filtration I'm running isn't exactly ideal as I have a 1000l/h external filter with a 2 litre pre filter to remove most of the waste particles before they enter the filter. The smell only seems to be really bad after feedings. Especially feedings of frozen brine shrimp and tubifex worms. Bloodworms don't seem to be a problem. Hikari lionhead pellets are also a bit wiffy [emoji90][emoji90] (they make up the majority of their diet). I am also currently experiencing some problems with algae growth in this tank leading me to think that the smell could be down to an excess of nutrients in the water [emoji53][emoji53] I am admittedly feeding them rather a lot of food at the moment as I have the tank temp at about 78-80° F but I perform water changes of about 20-30% every other day with a big 80% water change at the weekend to counteract this. I just didn't think that this would cause such a stink!
  3. I have lost many fish to dropsy in the past but was lead to believe that it was only a symptom of many possible things - swimbladder issues and constipation being included. Po was also housed with other goldfish which didn't seem to have any issues thus making me think that the problem was not bacterial or in any way contagious, hence the autopsy.Thanks so much for your input. It is a symptom of something else going on. I think most often it's a bacterial infection (often secondary to some other infection such as parasites, etc). I don't think I've ever heard of constipation causing full blown dropsy. I've had several fish with dropsy who were housed with other fish that did not develop dropsy. I've treated dropsy successfully several times. Having said that I will add "Once a dropsy, always a dropsy" cuz it does tend to recur and the fish usually doesn't seem to be as healthy as before the first bout of dropsy. In any case, if any of your future fish should develop the pineconing appearance, post here and we'd be happy to help you treat if you're interested. Sorry for the slow reply [emoji16] thanks for your input! Po didn't seem constipated at any point, that was just what I heard was one of the possible causes. He had a pretty high fibre diet so the chances of constipation were pretty slim given he was pretty regular [emoji6][emoji6]! I really appreciate all of the help I've had from everyone. I will make sure that if I do encounter any problems further down the line, I will come here first! The help is AMAZING! [emoji39]
  4. I'm assuming that the smaller lobe is the deflated one ??Thanks for the input! Yes. Ideally both lobes are inflated. Was the small lobe deflated when you first saw it? Could it have been punctured during your autopsy?I didn't use any tools or anything other than my fingers to remove the swimbladder from the fish. The fish was a good 6" in length and the point of incision was at quite a distance from the swimbladder, or at least not close enough to be able to reach it and puncture it.
  5. I'm assuming that the smaller lobe is the deflated one ??Thanks for the input! Yes. Ideally both lobes are inflated. Ah! Okay then! Thanks so much
  6. These guys look AMAZING!! Good luck, [emoji7][emoji7][emoji7]
  7. Thanks! [emoji4] It really is horrible to be in the situation where you either have to end your fishes life yourself, or let it live on in pain for an uncertain period of time. It was a hard decision to make, but judging by what people have said about 'deflated lobes' and other issues, I think it was for the best [emoji5]️[emoji5]️ Thanks for your response and I wish you the best of luck with your own fish!
  8. I'm assuming that the smaller lobe is the deflated one ?? Thanks for the input!
  9. I have lost many fish to dropsy in the past but was lead to believe that it was only a symptom of many possible things - swimbladder issues and constipation being included. Po was also housed with other goldfish which didn't seem to have any issues thus making me think that the problem was not bacterial or in any way contagious, hence the autopsy. Thanks so much for your input.
  10. One of my red and black orandas recently died of what I suspected was a swimbladder disorder. The first thing that led me to believe this was that the fish appeared extremely fat and his scales protruded quite severely from his skin. He also suffered from buoyancy issues in the run up to his death. He eventually stopped eating entirely and refused to venture from a small corner between the inlet to my filter and a cluster of fake plants. It was clear that he was in a lot of pain and his body seemed to be expanding more and more as the days passed. I finally euthanised him with clove oil, but was desperate to find out what was actually going on inside his body to cause this problem, so, I performed my very first autopsy! As you can see, the above image is that of Po's swimbladder. Being my first autopsy, I really didn't know what to expect and thought I would turn to the goldfish community in the hope that I may receive some answers. Is there any clear problem with the shown swimbladder that could have caused the problems described earlier? Everything else seemed pretty normal from the eyes of a novice 'autopsier' and there was no sign of parasites in his body cavity. Thanks in advance for any answers!
  11. They look awesome! Any more pictures? I bet they're massive by now [emoji12]
  12. Salt certainly won't do him any harm. Just dose him at half the recommended dosage and then see how he does. The salt will aid his gill function and if the redness you described is a break in the skin or anything like that, it can help to keep some infections out. I would suggest using ordinary pure rock salt without any anti caking agents. This is cheaper than aquarium salt but works just as well ![emoji12] this really is a remarkable story!! Good luck with the little fella.
  13. Sorry if this is a stupid question, but what do you mean by 'double (lobed) swimbladder'?
  14. These are selected for a nice tail and double(lobed) swimbladder, i have about 250 in this batch now out of about 2000 i thing.
  15. The parents look amazing! Looking forward to an update!
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