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Linzi Glitter

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Posts posted by Linzi Glitter

  1. Hi everyone!!!! :D

    I'm not going to complete the form just yet, because I think Alex might just pat me on the head and tell me not to worry so much (but I have all required info on hand if needed).

    I know that if the fish has a high fluke burden and you treat with prazi they might feel a bit sickly for a little while, but I just want to clarify the specific symptoms that could be expected if this were the case?

    My two teles came with a very high fluke burden (arrived in August last year), and I treated the whole tank to six rounds of PraziPro with salt at 0.1% (everyone also had a salt dip). The rest of the fish were completely unphased, but the two teles were occasionally bottom sitting at the start of the each round of Prazi.

    Recently the same symptoms (split fins, yawning, occasional bottom sitting) have recurred in those same two fish, so I have started treating for flukes again. I'm just bit concerned about the magnitude of Mao's reaction to each Prazi round. Everyone else is fine, but following the first dose of Prazi he was bottom sitting a lot (like all day) and was very listless (being pushed around by the current). He was also kind of slumped to one side (I nearly had a heart attack because thought he was dead), although his dorsal was erect and not clamped. When I tried to rouse him with a net, he barely made it off the bottom and just got pushed around in the current about 2cms from the bottom. A couple of days later he was 100% fine again. Second round of Prazi = same reaction. He seems to be picking up again now.

    Is this a normal reaction or should I start a proper D&D?

    I've read about closed populations of fish developing tolerance to flukes, and really upsetting introduced fish who lack the tolerance. Could this be at play here? My original fish had never been treated for flukes prior to the introduction of the two teles.

    Any info / advice would be appreciated! :D

  2. This thread is so informative, i think it should get pinned! :D

    Sharon answers so many questions about pond filtration, and it would be nice to have a go-to resource like this somewhere handy!

    (That's right, i lurk in the pond section imagining the dream pond oasis I willl build in my backyard one day, and fill with beautiful goldies the size of my head :rockon )

  3. Hi and welcome ... I did not get if you are treating your water but this is very important. Tap water contains chemicals that are toxic to fish, and water conditioner also helps with their slime coat. Alternatively, I think you could leave the replacement water out for a day prior to putting it in the tank (aging the water), but I've never done this.

    Pet shops giving out bad info is a common problem here in the U.S., too! I always double-check here if a pet shop recommendation sounds "fishy"! :-)

    I also fill up all my tanks all the way, though the water does evaporate a bit during the week since I use heaters.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

    Alex confirmed that Vietnam tap water doesn't contain chlorine or chloramines, so the advice wasn't fishy after all! :rofl

  4. My telescope Mao is.. well... a little dopey. All the other fish see me coming and swim over with their 'feed me' eyes, and he would just be oblivious wandering around the other side of the tank.

    The approaches suggested above are awesome, and helped me short term. I also tried teaching him to handfeed but it was just to tricky with the other water piggies getting in the way.

    Here's what has solved my problem long term: I feed my fish in the same place every time, and I use the same call ("Here fishy fishy!" - my partner thinks it's hilarious) to signal feeding time to them. They are now well conditioned, they hear me call and all swim over to that spot. Mao is always last to get there, but I don't put the food in until he does, and they all seem to get their fair share :D

  5. One good strategy is to just sit and appreciate the fish and set up you currently have. I like to look at my tank and think about how awesome it is that I have maintained a miniature ecosystem within those glass walls for a year now!! And how happy the goldies are to see me at dinner time! Our consumer driven society drives us to always want more, which keeps us striving, but striving isn't good if it is at the expense of gratitude for what we already have.

    Having said that, in a couple of years when I move house, I'm probably going to get another big tank for more quick squishy faces in my life :blush:

    My name is Linzi, and I have Multiple Tanks Syndrome :rofl

  6. perhaps grandma is over keeping fish? you should determine this first and perhaps it needs to be rescued? and then i guess that can be your queue to discuss proper husbandry (mildly) via your bf's help re the language barrier.. if it helps, show her a video of your happy goldfish swimming around so that she can see how active they can be in a proper environment :)

    i have a container in my handbag.. when i go to people's homes and see a goldfish tank, i try to inconspicuously take a water sample to bring home for testing. if i see issues, i let them know on my next visit.

    sometimes, people keep fish well in what we consider to be not so ideal situations. and because their fish are thriving, they will not take kindly to be told any different. best to see that the water is ideal and that should do. but for grandma, she may just be over keeping fish if you suspect that the tank has been neglected.

    lol @ Helen the Water Test Ninja!! :rofl

    There has been a good range of ideas raised about the situation with grandma's fish. I'm wondering about general strategies to approach people keeping goldfish in less than idea situations? I usually try to use "I" statements, as this tends to reduce the defensive reaction eg. "I don't like to have less than 75 litres per goldfish, because that way it's much easier to keep them healthy and thriving". But I'm also aware that this may come across like Amanda was fearing: with a sense-of-superiority.

    How have other people approached these kinds of conversations?

  7. Good questions asked above, but for what it's worth, the best way to increase dissolved oxygen is to increase the surface agitation eg. point your spray bar along the surface so it creates ripples. Air stones are effective for circulation, but don't increase the dissolved oxygen in the tank a whole lot more than the small amount of surface agitation they create. But they look pretty and some fish (especially the dorky ones!) enjoy swimming around in them :)

  8. Hey everyone,

    Hope you had a beautiful holiday and feel all refreshed! I know it's icy and snowy for a lot of you, but here in Melbourne we are having a heat wave! Today it is going to be 44*C / 111*F :yikes

    My tank is currently sitting at 32*C/ 89*F, which is hotter than I have ever seen it, and the day hasn't even heated up yet! They aren't showing any signs of stress, and there is plenty of aeration, so I guess I'm just looking for a little reassurance because I love them.

    Will they be ok? Should I reduce feedings or anything? I'm thinking of doing a 50% WC to bring the temp down a little, but don't want to stress them with too much temperature variance.

    Or should I just not worry so much lol :blush:

  9. Glad you're happy with your python!

    But for anyone else reading this thread to get an idea of water changing options, there are also really cheap and easy DIY options that are almost as good as Pythons/ Aqueons and 126,413,216,549,432,164,891 times better than buckets. I can't use a python because of my taps (very old house), so I just went to the hardware shop and explained what I was trying to do and they helped me put together a simple system of hoses that does the job quickly and easily without carrying buckets, for less than $20!!!!

    Wow, that is a good idea! The main reason I still use a gravel vac and buckets is that I'm having a difficult time justifying the high cost of a water changer. From what I understand, the water changer saves effort spent lugging buckets back and forth, but it takes the same amount of time as a gravel vac (or more) to drain the tank. Plus my tank is far away from my sink, so I'd have to buy additional tubing.

    Now, I might do this, or someone here recommended a site (I think it was Amazon) where they were selling the Python for about $30. I've only seen the Aqueon in stores and the cost was like $75!

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

    In the meantime you can get very long hoses from the hardware shop much cheaper than tubing from the lfs! A siphon (gravel vac) and hosing wins over buckets every time :D

    How do you affix the hose to the gravel vac to prevent leaks? This sounds like a great solution for me but I'm not great with fixing or setting up things. :-)

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

    You can buy little plastic things that look like this (only not T-shaped, couldn't find an image of a straight one). I think they are about $1!http://i00.i.aliimg.com/photo/v2/346500324/Hose_Tee_Connector_Pipe_Joint.jpg

    You just need to make sure you get the right size hose for the joining parts etc. The only issue I have had with leaks is with the original hose that came with the syphon, and I fixed that with plumbing tape (also from the hardware shop).

    Essentially I took my siphon to Bunnings, explained what I wanted to do with it, and they helped me along. Usually people who work at hardware shops are fix-it / DIY kinds of people, so they are very useful resources! :)

  10. Glad you're happy with your python!

    But for anyone else reading this thread to get an idea of water changing options, there are also really cheap and easy DIY options that are almost as good as Pythons/ Aqueons and 126,413,216,549,432,164,891 times better than buckets. I can't use a python because of my taps (very old house), so I just went to the hardware shop and explained what I was trying to do and they helped me put together a simple system of hoses that does the job quickly and easily without carrying buckets, for less than $20!!!!

    Wow, that is a good idea! The main reason I still use a gravel vac and buckets is that I'm having a difficult time justifying the high cost of a water changer. From what I understand, the water changer saves effort spent lugging buckets back and forth, but it takes the same amount of time as a gravel vac (or more) to drain the tank. Plus my tank is far away from my sink, so I'd have to buy additional tubing.

    Now, I might do this, or someone here recommended a site (I think it was Amazon) where they were selling the Python for about $30. I've only seen the Aqueon in stores and the cost was like $75!

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

    In the meantime you can get very long hoses from the hardware shop much cheaper than tubing from the lfs! A siphon (gravel vac) and hosing wins over buckets every time :D

  11. aww :) Too cute of a photo that you captured.

    lol this is the first time I've been able to catch her on camera doing this. Usually she jumps down and runs away - guilty conscience!! :rofl

    That's so cute! My cats don't care much for the fish, thankfully :P

    haha yes you're lucky you don't need security on your tank!

  12. Glad you're happy with your python!

    But for anyone else reading this thread to get an idea of water changing options, there are also really cheap and easy DIY options that are almost as good as Pythons/ Aqueons and 126,413,216,549,432,164,891 times better than buckets. I can't use a python because of my taps (very old house), so I just went to the hardware shop and explained what I was trying to do and they helped me put together a simple system of hoses that does the job quickly and easily without carrying buckets, for less than $20!!!!

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