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Arctic Mama

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Everything posted by Arctic Mama

  1. I have no idea, but you could cut some small pieces and float them in the tank, see if they eat them and observe symptoms? Generally speaking it’s best to stick to aquatic and swamp plants with goldies, since they’re not land foraging. But obviously there are some terrestrial veggies they like.
  2. They’re fairly messy too - I do love apple snails but they’re giant poopers. I haven’t had one crawl out of the top but close! They usually just go along the upper rim and back down, though.
  3. I’m so glad it helped! Many of the problems we see on this forum are husbandry and water quality problems. Goldfish are somewhat unique that way, in that they’re both very widely kept fish but also have some surprising unique issues with waste production and water quality that the standard advice for tropical fish keeping doesn’t address. Water testing, LARGE regular water changes, and filter maintenance are the most critical factors for their help. Along with proper quarantine procedures with new livestock you can avoid almost all illness with them. Goldfish keepers are water keepers first and foremost. If your water quality is kept in top shape that keeps everything else running smoothly. Knocking junk from the filters (never toss the media unless it’s disintegrating, always just rinse the filter pads in old tank water and hit them against the sides of a bucket to knock poop free) is the only big maintenance required beyond water changes and regular testing to make sure your nitrates haven’t climbed. High nitrates aren’t as instantly toxic to the fish as nitrites and ammonia but they still cause harm and weaken the fish’s immune system when they’re persistently high. But they can climb without any symptoms for a long time and to very high levels if you aren’t looking for it. Especially in a small tank, large and frequent water changes and testing before those water changes to make sure you’re not climbing beyond about 20 ppms of nitrate is really important. It saves so much drama and heartache
  4. I love snails so much! I don’t have any in my tanks right now but I miss them.
  5. They’re social animals and they definitely recognize their owners and regular people. Don’t know about talking, but I anthropomorphize my pets all the time - imagining they’re communicating that way is fun
  6. Okay, the rays. Well I have good and bad news for you. The good news is that this happens sometimes; I’ve even had it happen in my own tank. A ray or multiple rays either get bent or bumped or have other trauma and they develop a little bone spur spot on them. Sometimes this happens with an infection too, weirdly enough. The rays can break and the fins can shred and then regrow. Something they never do and just stay bumpy. The bad news is that unless it’s due to infection it isn’t treatable. You just leave it alone. The good news is that it’s usually harmless and doesn’t need treatment, especially if a mechanical injury like bending the rays on a filter or a rough handling catch is the issue. If there are no other symptoms it’s not a big deal to leave alone and ignore. remember how we suggested the flukes could be causing rubbing or flashing and thus the red spot you noted? That same action against the tank or substrate is likely exactly what bent those rays
  7. Okay can you circle on the picture what dots you’re taking about? I see the rays of the fin and some little white bits. But we might be talking about different spots.
  8. Try to rub them with your fingers. Do they come off easily when scraped? Are they soft or harder like sand grains? On the surface of the fin or feel like they’re imbedded?
  9. Okay so that means the irritation isn’t from the med combo. Definitely let’s leave her alone in the hospital tank with the salt and meth blue for a week, just do water changes every two or three days and feed lightly so the ammonia stays down, that’s what you’ll need to keep an eye on and the meth blue can make it tough to check that accurately because it tints the water. So stay on top of the changes and keep feeds very small and once daily so pooping is minimal, and we should be okay. Then next week we will get new pictures or video and discuss what treatments, if any, to do next
  10. Don’t run carbon in your tank on a regular basis, it’s only needed when trying to remove certain meds you just need mechanical and biological filtration, no chemical. water changes should be large, almost complete, as a rule that’s better for goldfish. 80-100% changes, which are best achieved by two partial water changes back to back. I like to drain it down until the water barely covers my fish, refill halfway, and drain back down again before completely refilling. That changes over almost the entire water volume without having to scoop out the animals.
  11. Yes you dose and leave it in the aquarium for four days, then so a water change and leave things without meds for three days, then redose again the following week and repeat. Four days in, three days out = one round. The prazi only acts on hatched flukes, the ones that aren’t hatched out are protected. So giving time with it out of the aquarium lets more mature and become vulnerable to the medication. This is a common treatment schedule with parasite medications.
  12. Praziquantel - powdered prazi is my favorite, easily obtained. https://smithcreekfishfarm.com/products/prazi-power-praziquantel-powder You dose it in several weeks of rounds, four days in the aquarium and three days out. The rounds give any fluke eggs a chance to hatch out. Usually three rounds is sufficient to drop the fluke load to almost nothing, though it’s almost impossible to completely eliminate gill flukes in Goldfish if they have ever been exposed. It’s a very safe medication and considered preventative annual care, but be aware some fish get pouty and bottom sit during prazi. This is normal and a sign that fish needed the treatment!
  13. Hi there! That is a LOT of mess very quickly and several that interact with one another, please ask before tossing medication at a problem so we can help narrow it down and keep the stress on the fish as low as possible can you give me calendar dates and any overlap for the medications you used on this fish in the last month or two? It doesn’t immediately look like velvet, but I need to understand what you tried and when, for which symptoms. For now if you can move this guy to a hospital tank that would be great. Could be a tote or a five gallon bucket. We need a heater and an air stone, and you’re going to slowly bump the temperature up to 76-78 degrees over the course of a few days, okay? No more than a degree every two hours, to keep stress low. That hospital tank is going to start with methylene blue and salt at .3% concentration, or roughly one tablespoon per gallon of water. The meth blue dose will depend on the size of the hospital tank, okay? But we need to treat this without the bio load of the substrate and filters involved, and to protect the plants. Running that main tank much hotter for two or three weeks should hatch out any parasites and quell any bacterial issues, since there would be no host left. I’d get the main tank to the mid to high eighties if you can. It shouldn’t hurt the plants at all. In that picture I see excess slime coat, that’s it. So we are going to isolate and wait to see if other symptoms emerge. The excess slime coat could have just been a reaction to the meds - combining the ich cure with salt is a terrible mix, and could have worsened any irritation of the fish. So the current plan is warm, clean water with gentle treatment to support the slime coat for now and then see what we are working with after a week or so like that. It may be enough to resolve the symptoms in its own or else clarify what you see on the fish’s scales that I’m not seeing.
  14. I’m inclined to agree that nothing needs to be done now, except maybe the annual rounds of prazi if you haven’t treated for flukes in the last year or so. Sometimes we see those little irritated spots when fluke load increases and the fish begins to rub or flash. Do you need help running prazi rounds?
  15. Maybe not, I only saw one in the disease forum.
  16. Hi there! It’s really important we get some more details about this tank and the fish in it, knowing what they may have been exposed to can help us diagnose. Please fill out this diagnostic form as completely as possible, and we can figure out a course of treatment if one is needed Test Results for the Following: * Ammonia Level(Tank) * Nitrite Level(Tank) * Nitrate level(Tank) * Ammonia Level(Tap) * Nitrite Level(Tap) * Nitrate level(Tap) * Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) * Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) Other Required Info: * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? * Water temperature? * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? * How often do you change the water and how much? * How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? * How many fish in the tank and their size? * What kind of water additives or conditioners? * What do you feed your fish and how often? * Any new fish added to the tank? * Any medications added to the tank? * List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment. * Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?
  17. Yeah. I locked and hid that until @koko can delete it. Spammers here are rare but it does happen sometimes.
  18. Okay the repashy is probably the issue, it seems to gum up systems way more than other foods and makes a bit of a mess, that plus the water changes would explain the nitrates. Your tank is way too small for that many goldfish, and of that size. So you absolutely must compensate with larger water changes and more frequently knocking the poop and mulm from your canister filter’s media. if you’re not already, be rinsing any filter floss in that canister in old tank water monthly. Water changes should be 80-100% twice weekly on a tank that size. I’m not exaggerating. Your nitrate should not get above 20 ppms and you’re ten times that amount, which is stressing the animals out and making them sick. The white stringy poop is most likely just due to stress and not a parasite or bacterial infection, but even if it is we must figure out the water quality first. Your first order of business is a complete water change, or very close to it. I like to drain the tank until the water is just barely covering the fish, refill it halfway with dechlorinated water, and then drain it back down to barely cover the fish. Once it is fully refilled the water is nearly 100% changed that way (with two partial changes) and you don’t have to mess with catching the animals or anything like that. Doing that at LEAST one day per week, with another partial change mid week, is your best bet for keeping the nitrate reasonable in a tank that size. With just this change in water maintenance I wouldn’t be surprised if your buoyancy issues are mostly or completely solved and it will drastically improve the health and longevity of the fish Any questions? If you can maintain that water change schedule for two weeks and check back in with us as to how they’re doing, we can treat any residual issues then. But even the sore spot on his belly from floating isn’t going to get better if his immune system is compromised from a dirty tank, so that must be fixed before we try other things.
  19. Yes, you can run two rounds of prazi, each a week long (four days medication in, three days of break, repeat) as soon as the sulfaplex is out.
  20. Honestly if the fins are improving and there are zero other symptoms besides the one raised patch, hold off on the kanaplex and just let the fish rest until something else pops up or the swelling gets worse. We will assume the lifted scales are benign until other things in the fish’s condition indicate otherwise. Better to not use a medication we don’t have to, so it’s efficacy remains high for a later time when we DO desperately need it.
  21. Look up Gary Hater on Facebook He’s wonderful. https://thegoldfishcouncil.org/team/gary-hater/
  22. Can you please get the information and history details of the fish and the tank into the actual form? I look to specific parts of it for information and refer back often, the organizational format helps me help you. if you’re able, the strips are really inaccurate and a liquid test kit is a better choice. We recommend the API Freshwater Master Test kit, which Chewy has for a good price for US residents. Your nitrate is either mis-tested or off the charts ridiculously toxic. What kind of water change schedule do you have? Tank volume? Feeding schedule? Many more details please
  23. I’m going to need a lot more information and pictures to help more, so I know we aren’t missing a cause. Please attach as many clear pictures as you can that show him floating and his sore spot. Then fill out our diagnostic form with as much information as you can. A video of him swimming would also be helpful Test Results for the Following: * Ammonia Level(Tank) * Nitrite Level(Tank) * Nitrate level(Tank) * Ammonia Level(Tap) * Nitrite Level(Tap) * Nitrate level(Tap) * Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) * Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) Other Required Info: * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? * Water temperature? * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? * How often do you change the water and how much? * How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? * How many fish in the tank and their size? * What kind of water additives or conditioners? * What do you feed your fish and how often? * Any new fish added to the tank? * Any medications added to the tank? * List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment. * Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?
  24. Unfortunately swimbladder issues are usually either blockages due to constipation or a mechanically damaged or malformed swimbladder. Constipation you can observe with a fish who has thick poops or bubbles in their poop and whose swim bladder buoyancy issues improve after two or three days of fasting the fish. If that isn’t the case, there is no medication to treat it. A floater or lister will always do that. Many can live long and happy lives that way but some have problems that lead to secondary infections snd wounds from either being exposed to the air on one side or pinned to the bottom running substrate. Those can be treated too, if it’s an issue. Fish with swimbladder issues often benefit from shallow water - like six inches of depth, like a kiddie pool or under bed tote. Give that a try as well if you have a persistent floater and see if it doesn’t improve their balance in the water.
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