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Arctic Mama

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Everything posted by Arctic Mama

  1. Yeah I’d say ten gallons is the minimum unless you’re keeping a single sex of guppies, and even then they like swimming around. A twenty long is a better choice. I like Platys, they’re cute!
  2. Lady Loki could definitely be changing, it’s common! As shown above, pictures help for the comparison I’ve had fish go from orange to white, pale orange to almost red, black to a lemon yellow and medium orange, etc.
  3. Also liking the forum upgrades! I’ll have to poke around more later, nice work @koko!
  4. Yup that’s major color change! I always enjoy that in younger fish, it’s interesting how the expression of their colors changes as they grow. Some have much less stable coloring than others, even with no black present. Buddy is cute!
  5. We have had heat waves here too. It’s not fun. Today is about 90 F with high humidity. Also one of my daughters is turned 13 today. Crazy crazy how time flies.
  6. They eat them more easily if they’re squeezed out of the shells. Spinach is popular here too, but like one leaf per goldfish, blanched. Mine love blanched zucchini too, if the ancistrus doesn’t eat it all first 😚 Koko that heart turned out great!
  7. The general rule is that frequent water changes do help the fish grow bigger because it removes growth inhibiting hormones released into the water with the fish’s waste. Most breeders keep vigorous water change schedules or flow through systems for this reason, along with optimal water quality. I think you can probably scale back to twice per week though. Heavy feeding of high protein food like bloodworms or mysis shrimp is the other main hack for growing big, vigorous goldfish. It works better than pellets, because those have filler, but heavier feeding in general will help. The tradeoff of warm water and heavier feeding is speeding up the goldfish metabolisms and shortening their lives a bit. It can stress their organs too, depending on the quality of the food. Generally speaking three small, protein heavy meals per day for a juvenile fish should be plenty to help them grow well without overdoing it. Beyond that and I think it can get dodgy for their long term health, even though many breeders swear by it.
  8. My guppies are breeding right now too, they’re fun
  9. Those are cute! Plaster in molds?
  10. …. How did it get so hot? Municipal tap water, even in places like Palm Springs or Tucson, doesn’t usually get above 80 degrees or so. In terms of water cleanliness, don't over-clean! Tossing filter cartridges instead of just knocking out the solids and rinsing them quickly in tank water can cause cycle bumps, and those cycle bumps can cause things like cloudy water and algae blooms. Generally speaking your tank water should get fairly clear within about two days of a water change and lights off. If it doesn’t, we need to start testing the water chemistry and figure out what is going awry. you should be absolutely fine returning the cartridge and bio wheel - keep those running, the hotter water won’t do much damage as long as it is dechlorinated.
  11. Good luck on your story!!! As for why fry look different, do you mean their baby coloration? It makes them blend in with pond water and the muddy bottom of streams and lakes, making them camouflaged to predators who would eat them. As they get bigger and stronger the fry colors shift, but it’s a preservation strategy to help the goldfish survive to reproductive age, themselves
  12. That’s called a blood parrot, they’re a kind of hybridized South American cichlid They're wonderful characters, very fun fish. But not at all compatible with goldfish. For one thing they thrive in warm, acidic tank conditions! They can also be territorial fin nippers.
  13. I’d need to see some pictures of the fin rot to help with treatment, and we need the diagnostic form filled out just to assure nothing else is going on that might have come in with the new fish, and that tank chemistry is as it should be and conducive to healing, too. so pictures, please, and fill this out as completely as possible Test Results for the Following: * Ammonia Level(Tank) * Nitrite Level(Tank) * Nitrate level(Tank) * Ammonia Level(Tap) * Nitrite Level(Tap) * Nitrate level(Tap) * Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) * Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) Other Required Info: * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? * Water temperature? * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? * How often do you change the water and how much? * How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? * How many fish in the tank and their size? * What kind of water additives or conditioners? * What do you feed your fish and how often? * Any new fish added to the tank? * Any medications added to the tank? * List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment. * Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?
  14. I love overgrown tanks, they always look more natural to me. Yours is beautiful, Hannah!
  15. I need to do some tonight too, in the guppy tank and goldfish, too. And the guppy fry bucket. My fish ADORE bug bites, all of them. I’m pretty sure Fluval has made some actual version of fish crack with those 😂
  16. Huh, not that I know of. Not a living fish, anyway, unless they were squeezed or had an organ rupture due to trauma or something similar. Pineconing, even severely, doesn’t really look the same. Weird.
  17. Just remember you can and should run prazi annually on all your goldfish. It is harmless to them but very helpful for controlling Gill flukes, which do tend to proliferate over time. I’m so glad things are looking better.
  18. Never run carbon again unless we tell you to it’s almost useless in a healthy tank, and the big water change is definitely sufficient to remove the prazi. I’m glad it shipped to you so quickly!
  19. Prazi has a very wide margin of safety, it’s hard to overdose. Just do a heaping quarter teaspoon and you’ll be fine I like to hold it in my hand and rub my fingers together in the water to disperse it, because it clumps up otherwise.
  20. I have no idea, but you could cut some small pieces and float them in the tank, see if they eat them and observe symptoms? Generally speaking it’s best to stick to aquatic and swamp plants with goldies, since they’re not land foraging. But obviously there are some terrestrial veggies they like.
  21. They’re fairly messy too - I do love apple snails but they’re giant poopers. I haven’t had one crawl out of the top but close! They usually just go along the upper rim and back down, though.
  22. I’m so glad it helped! Many of the problems we see on this forum are husbandry and water quality problems. Goldfish are somewhat unique that way, in that they’re both very widely kept fish but also have some surprising unique issues with waste production and water quality that the standard advice for tropical fish keeping doesn’t address. Water testing, LARGE regular water changes, and filter maintenance are the most critical factors for their help. Along with proper quarantine procedures with new livestock you can avoid almost all illness with them. Goldfish keepers are water keepers first and foremost. If your water quality is kept in top shape that keeps everything else running smoothly. Knocking junk from the filters (never toss the media unless it’s disintegrating, always just rinse the filter pads in old tank water and hit them against the sides of a bucket to knock poop free) is the only big maintenance required beyond water changes and regular testing to make sure your nitrates haven’t climbed. High nitrates aren’t as instantly toxic to the fish as nitrites and ammonia but they still cause harm and weaken the fish’s immune system when they’re persistently high. But they can climb without any symptoms for a long time and to very high levels if you aren’t looking for it. Especially in a small tank, large and frequent water changes and testing before those water changes to make sure you’re not climbing beyond about 20 ppms of nitrate is really important. It saves so much drama and heartache
  23. I love snails so much! I don’t have any in my tanks right now but I miss them.
  24. They’re social animals and they definitely recognize their owners and regular people. Don’t know about talking, but I anthropomorphize my pets all the time - imagining they’re communicating that way is fun
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