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Sharkasm

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  1. After a few unsuccessful batches of hatching brine shrimp i sent away for freeze dried uncapsulated shrimp eggs and to my dismay the fry wont even touch them though they are reportedly sometimes even better then actual live baby brine shrimp.. trying to get my local store to stock the frozen.. for now hikari first bites.. hoping i can find some soon i have a newly hatched batch of pure yellow comets that i'm looking forward to

  2. I believe it must be from another breeding session I wasn't aware of and had to have gotten into the breeding tank when I moved a sponge that I keep over the inlet of the external filter from one tank to another. I wanted to have it in place now so that when the fry are large enough I dont have to disturb too much and I can then just plug it in when they are large enough to handle the current. He's free swimming and I did have a chance to see him feed last night. The only other pair that I have seen in a spawning chase were two small orandas one bright orange female and one with a black top and fins with orange sides. should be interesting to see what it grows into. Could be a number of other fish from the main tank too. I'm just going to have to wait and see!

  3. I believe it must be from another breeding session I wasn't aware of and had to have gotten into the breeding tank when I moved a sponge that I keep over the inlet of the external filter from one tank to another. I wanted to have it in place now so that when the fry are large enough I dont have to disturb too much and I can then just plug it in when they are large enough to handle the current. He's free swimming and I did have a chance to see him feed last night. The only other pair that I have seen in a spawning chase were two small orandas one bright orange female and one with a black top and fins with orange sides. should be interesting to see what it grows into. Could be a number of other fish from the main tank too. I'm just going to have to wait and see!

  4. I've been breeding goldies for over a year now and have been experimenting with which methods turn out to be the most successful and am about to share my most top secret methods with you. Here is everything you would want to know about breeding goldies. If you?re lucky enough to have eggs already, just scroll to the section that you need.

    What You?ll Need

    Spare tank (5 US gals or more)

    Brine shrimp cultivating kit

    Aquarium salt

    Methylene blue

    Sponge filter and pump

    Ice cream tub

    Silk or real plants

    Sexing Fish

    The male goldfish will look more streamlined than the female, who will have a rather round looking belly. Also, the females vent (anus) will stick out whereas the males will not (although, as I have found, this method is not 100% correct but about 1% of the time, you?ll find a male with some identity issues!). Around breeding time, the males will get a line of spots on the first bone of the pectoral fin and gill covers like this:

    02100416.jpg

    Making Goldies Spawn

    This is one of the most challenging parts of breeding goldfish. Some of the most successful ways to trigger spawning is to lower the temperature of your tank to about 64-68f for about 1-2 weeks. The tank needs to have real or silk plants in so the female has something soft to get bashed into to lay her eggs in. During this cold period, feed your fish lots of high protein meals (tubifex etc) and feed often. This will mean you have to do more regular water changes due to more waste being produced which will help with spawning induction. By this time, the female should look very round with eggs and fat. Then gradually warm the tank up to about 75-78?f over the space of a few days.

    During Spawning

    While your fish are spawning, as the males follow the female constantly with their head up her backside she may get a bit battered, especially if your female is breed that tends to waddle like a pearlscale and your male is something like a common or shubunkin. If she gets too beaten up, take her out. If you're new to breeding, take out the plants with the eggs on and put them in a spare tank and wait for them to hatch. If you are very familiar with breeding and handling you fish, I would recommend hand spawning. Take the male(s) doing the chasing and put them into an ice cream tub or something like that filled with tank water. Gently squeeze the abdomen down to the vent. You should be able to see milt coming out. If it is a very fertile male, the water will be quite cloudy after a hand spawning session. Release the male back into the tank and take the female. Often, you just holding the female and her wriggling makes the eggs come out, if not, use the same method as you did for the male, only more gentle and as soon as the eggs come out, swirl them around with her tail to separate them as if they stick together, they will not develop properly. PLEASE DO NOT HAND SPAWN IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF YOUR ABILITIES OR ATTEMPT TO HAND SPAWN ANY FISH AT ANY TIME OTHER THAN DURING OR SHORTLY AFTER NATURAL SPAWNING. Squeezing a female while she is still very full of eggs can rupture the ovaries and cause potentially fatal internal damage. This is why it is best to hand spawn shortly after she has released most of her eggs during the natural spawning.

    Care of Eggs

    Once you have your tub of eggs, sink it in another tank of cycled water about (not stolen from another tank as this increases the chances of pathogens being spread onto the fry). The tank should only be 6? deep at this point and should be bare bottom. It should also have a sponge filter installed. Do not wipe off the algae from the inside of the tank as this is a good natural food for the fry. Put the temperature up to about 78?f for optimal growth (if the tank is less than 5 US gals, don?t bother with a heater, it?ll just cook your eggs. Place in a warm room instead). I have found that adding aquarium salt to the fry tank at 0.3% concentration avoids problems such as flukes and should always be present with the fry at this concentration until the 4 month stage where they should be weaned off the salt gradually. Methylene blue is also useful for preventing fungus on small fry and eggs. Add some to the tank until the water is a ?Windex? blue. After a few days, you should be able to see little black dots inside the egg. At about day 5, the fry will move around inside the eggs occasionally. This should be around the time that they hatch. This is also the time to start cultivating baby brine shrimp. Kits can be easily obtained at you local pet store and aren?t too expensive or tricky to get going. I find other foods don?t kick start the growth of the fry and aren?t worth the bother.

    Caring for the Fry

    For the first couple of days after they hatch, the fry will hang off the plants of side of the tank. Do not feed them at this stage as they are re-absorbing their egg sacks. When they are free swimming, begin feeding small amounts of baby brine shrimp. Put in as many as the fry will eat in about 1-2 hours, four times per day. The fry will begin to look like fish in about 1-2 weeks. Do not do any water changes until the fry are about a month old and only do so very carefully with an air-line tube from the pump. However, you may need to get rid of excess food or dead fry from the bottom of the tank so a turkey baster can be a handy tool. At this stage, add soaked, crushed pellets to the diet. If there are any fry that are particularly small or particularly big, they should be separated from the rest of the group. At two months the fry should be getting big quickly so wean them off the baby brine shrimp as it can get costly when the fry are so big that they merely inhale the creatures! At three months, the fry should be changing colour and be about 1.5? big. For the next couple of months feed regularly, change the water regularly and look for homes for your babies!

    If you do have any problems breeding, of course feel free to ask :)

    Got my first batch of eggs this morning at 8 o'clock.. it's 8 p.m. and there's a fry swimming around in the tank! Is that normal? That's 12 hours! I could not even see an egg sac on the belly. I'm totally baffled by this. There were no breeding pairs in that tank before today. I put them in this morning when i saw the courtship chase begin and within minutes they were in the spawning mop. I've only spotted one so far but I am going to be keeping a very close eye on them. Stumped here.. any thoughts?

  5. I've been breeding goldies for over a year now and have been experimenting with which methods turn out to be the most successful and am about to share my most top secret methods with you. Here is everything you would want to know about breeding goldies. If you?re lucky enough to have eggs already, just scroll to the section that you need.

    What You?ll Need

    Spare tank (5 US gals or more)

    Brine shrimp cultivating kit

    Aquarium salt

    Methylene blue

    Sponge filter and pump

    Ice cream tub

    Silk or real plants

    Sexing Fish

    The male goldfish will look more streamlined than the female, who will have a rather round looking belly. Also, the females vent (anus) will stick out whereas the males will not (although, as I have found, this method is not 100% correct but about 1% of the time, you?ll find a male with some identity issues!). Around breeding time, the males will get a line of spots on the first bone of the pectoral fin and gill covers like this:

    02100416.jpg

    Making Goldies Spawn

    This is one of the most challenging parts of breeding goldfish. Some of the most successful ways to trigger spawning is to lower the temperature of your tank to about 64-68f for about 1-2 weeks. The tank needs to have real or silk plants in so the female has something soft to get bashed into to lay her eggs in. During this cold period, feed your fish lots of high protein meals (tubifex etc) and feed often. This will mean you have to do more regular water changes due to more waste being produced which will help with spawning induction. By this time, the female should look very round with eggs and fat. Then gradually warm the tank up to about 75-78?f over the space of a few days.

    During Spawning

    While your fish are spawning, as the males follow the female constantly with their head up her backside she may get a bit battered, especially if your female is breed that tends to waddle like a pearlscale and your male is something like a common or shubunkin. If she gets too beaten up, take her out. If you're new to breeding, take out the plants with the eggs on and put them in a spare tank and wait for them to hatch. If you are very familiar with breeding and handling you fish, I would recommend hand spawning. Take the male(s) doing the chasing and put them into an ice cream tub or something like that filled with tank water. Gently squeeze the abdomen down to the vent. You should be able to see milt coming out. If it is a very fertile male, the water will be quite cloudy after a hand spawning session. Release the male back into the tank and take the female. Often, you just holding the female and her wriggling makes the eggs come out, if not, use the same method as you did for the male, only more gentle and as soon as the eggs come out, swirl them around with her tail to separate them as if they stick together, they will not develop properly. PLEASE DO NOT HAND SPAWN IF YOU ARE UNSURE OF YOUR ABILITIES OR ATTEMPT TO HAND SPAWN ANY FISH AT ANY TIME OTHER THAN DURING OR SHORTLY AFTER NATURAL SPAWNING. Squeezing a female while she is still very full of eggs can rupture the ovaries and cause potentially fatal internal damage. This is why it is best to hand spawn shortly after she has released most of her eggs during the natural spawning.

    Care of Eggs

    Once you have your tub of eggs, sink it in another tank of cycled water about (not stolen from another tank as this increases the chances of pathogens being spread onto the fry). The tank should only be 6? deep at this point and should be bare bottom. It should also have a sponge filter installed. Do not wipe off the algae from the inside of the tank as this is a good natural food for the fry. Put the temperature up to about 78?f for optimal growth (if the tank is less than 5 US gals, don?t bother with a heater, it?ll just cook your eggs. Place in a warm room instead). I have found that adding aquarium salt to the fry tank at 0.3% concentration avoids problems such as flukes and should always be present with the fry at this concentration until the 4 month stage where they should be weaned off the salt gradually. Methylene blue is also useful for preventing fungus on small fry and eggs. Add some to the tank until the water is a ?Windex? blue. After a few days, you should be able to see little black dots inside the egg. At about day 5, the fry will move around inside the eggs occasionally. This should be around the time that they hatch. This is also the time to start cultivating baby brine shrimp. Kits can be easily obtained at you local pet store and aren?t too expensive or tricky to get going. I find other foods don?t kick start the growth of the fry and aren?t worth the bother.

    Caring for the Fry

    For the first couple of days after they hatch, the fry will hang off the plants of side of the tank. Do not feed them at this stage as they are re-absorbing their egg sacks. When they are free swimming, begin feeding small amounts of baby brine shrimp. Put in as many as the fry will eat in about 1-2 hours, four times per day. The fry will begin to look like fish in about 1-2 weeks. Do not do any water changes until the fry are about a month old and only do so very carefully with an air-line tube from the pump. However, you may need to get rid of excess food or dead fry from the bottom of the tank so a turkey baster can be a handy tool. At this stage, add soaked, crushed pellets to the diet. If there are any fry that are particularly small or particularly big, they should be separated from the rest of the group. At two months the fry should be getting big quickly so wean them off the baby brine shrimp as it can get costly when the fry are so big that they merely inhale the creatures! At three months, the fry should be changing colour and be about 1.5? big. For the next couple of months feed regularly, change the water regularly and look for homes for your babies!

    If you do have any problems breeding, of course feel free to ask :)

    Got my first batch of eggs this morning at 8 o'clock.. it's 8 p.m. and there's a fry swimming around in the tank! Is that normal? That's 12 hours! I could not even see an egg sac on the belly. I'm totally baffled by this. There were no breeding pairs in that tank before today. I put them in this morning when i saw the courtship chase begin and within minutes they were in the spawning mop. I've only spotted one so far but I am going to be keeping a very close eye on them. Stumped here.. any thoughts?

  6. I really want to breed my golfish to stock my year old pond and possibly a much larger pond project in design stages. Any fish under an inch or so long I lose to garter snakes so i want to breed indoors soon and raise them large enough to be introduced to the pond this summer. Here is my dilemma. My house is kept at a constant 70 degrees day and night so the water temp will never fall below that to simulate seasonal changes. I am feeding heavily with daily water changes of 10-20% and just recently added a heater to try and bring it up closer to the 75 degree range. I'm hoping that will help. Any other thoughts other than spending a small fortune on a chiller system?

    Looks like the water changes and feeding and a few degree difference was all it took. I woke this morning to a chase going on in the main tank so i moved the culprits into a breeding tank. 1 large orange and white fancy and 1 male the same but a little smaller and one grey- black fancy about half her size also a male. It was only minutes before the chasing resumed and 30 minutes later i could see the first eggs! I was unfortunately working at the time from home so I couldnt supervise all of it and most of the first eggs i noticed are gone presumably eaten and the chase continues.

    I made an acrylic yarn spawning mop which seems to be her favorite spot when ready and it does seem to hide a certain amount of the eggs from them. I plan on removing the paretns when they're done and leaving the eggs here to incubate and brgin to raise until they are large enough to tranfer into a larger tank. I'll update later again. I just got out of work!

    Stay tuned!

  7. I really want to breed my golfish to stock my year old pond and possibly a much larger pond project in design stages. Any fish under an inch or so long I lose to garter snakes so i want to breed indoors soon and raise them large enough to be introduced to the pond this summer. Here is my dilemma. My house is kept at a constant 70 degrees day and night so the water temp will never fall below that to simulate seasonal changes. I am feeding heavily with daily water changes of 10-20% and just recently added a heater to try and bring it up closer to the 75 degree range. I'm hoping that will help. Any other thoughts other than spending a small fortune on a chiller system?

  8. Country: USA

    Town & State: Framingham, Massachusetts

    Name of Store: Tropic Isle Aquarium

    Address: 4 Pierce St

    Framingham, MA 01702

    Phone number: (508) 875-5303

    Review: The folks here are knowledgeable and helpful, and they carry a lot of supplies as well, including many that you can't get at most aquarium shops. It's a very large place that has been in business for a long time, and has a good reputation in the area west of Boston. They have a larger selection of goldfish than any other store I have seen, and an enormous number of other kinds of fish as well. It's always fun to go there to see the elaborate marine tank setups and the wide variety of fishes.

    I used to get a lot of my salt water aquarium supplies and livestock there. Great place I just wish it were closer. I wasn't into ponds or goldfish at the time so I never paid much attention.

  9. Hi... i was wondering if it is possible to breed a normal goldfish with one of them fancy ones ... (the fatter ones with the fancy tails)????? Because i've got a bunch of goldfish i was thinking about breeding but all the normal ones are males... the only females i have are the black one with the Bugged out eyes and the fatter one with the fancy tail.... just wondering if it was possible to cross breed them...

    405601[/snapback]

    All goldfish are one species and it is perfectly ok to cross-breed. U can even cross-breed them with koi :D

    You can cross-breed with koi however hte offspring will be infertile and drab in color from what i have learned. The good thing about it though is that they tend to be more durable and over winter better in colder climates!

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