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Pearlscaleperfect

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Everything posted by Pearlscaleperfect

  1. I agree pictures and video would be wonderful. When was the last time you treated for flukes?
  2. Okay so I'm fairly certain I have it figured out after reading a few papers and watching my fish breathe for about 20 minutes. If the mouth is open the opercular valves (think the opening into the gills, via the operculum, where the flappy fleshy part is) is closed. This is because they are drawing water into the buccal chamber by exploiting the lower pressure. They then close the mouth and open the opercular valves and contract the buccal cavity pushing water over the gill fillaments and out of the gills. So if the object was stuck in a position which held the mouth open this would most likely hold the opercular valves closed, since these structures function involuntarily and in tandem with one another. Thus not allowing oxygen to pass over the gills or allow metabolic wastes to be excreted from the gills, therefore asphyxiating the fish. If the object is lodged further back into the mouth it is probable that the opercular valves would remain open allowing some water to pass over the gills although not in an efficient fashion. It is also possible that if it is pushed far back into the buccal cavity that the mouth could still open and close allowing for respiration to continue, although the current flow would be hindered by the obstruction. So the chances of asphyxiation would be lowered more if the object was most likely asymmetrical or angular and not conforming to the mouth shape so that is lodged into the buccal cavity water could still continue to pass around it while the opercular valves remained open. However this mechanism is not the case for every species of fish as many gill and mouth structures vary greatly, but I'm fairly certain this is the case for goldfish(and quite a decent amount of bony fish). Here's a helpful diagram I found in case anyone cant figure out the anatomy I'm mentioning.
  3. Ive never had a choking occur (or even a stuck piece) so I'm interested in the mechanics of this as well. Theoretically the fish cannot 'choke'(purely because to the best of my knowledge choking is only defined as a lack of air) but rather asphyxiate if oxygenated water is not passing over the gills at a certain rate (what this rate is in goldfish is most likely based on metabolism and other factors of each individual). Alex, do you remember if the fish that died had it's mouth 'open' or was the gravel lodged further back in the mouth. Because the gills are a fairly open system which makes asphyxiation something that is rather hard to achieve. Because I have such limited experience with it I'd love to hear from members who have had issues with it and if they can recall the exact physical state of the fish, especially the mouth's and gill's positions to try and draw some more conclusive mechanism behind it. I would assume asphyxiation is more likely to occur when the obstruction becomes lodged further back into the mouth, restricting water flow over the gills more so than a mouth that remains more open, but this is purely based on how the bones in the mouth move and my own musings on the topic.
  4. I'd like to add that I have flourite in my goldie tank which is probably more technically a gravel than any other substrate. But because of its flat chip like shape it doesn't seem to pose the choking hazard that gravels do (at least in my experience). Besides the fact that my tank is fairly well planted I don't vacuum the gravel heavily so I don't disturb or damage the plants root systems. As long as the gravel bed is not too deep and is well kept I don't see any reason why it would be a health hazard, I certainly don't think mine is. I do prefer sand but for the purposes of this tank I felt fourite was well suited and would recommend it as a substrate for goldfish (but probably only if you want to plant the tank).
  5. They look fantastic!!! I'm jealous of your giants!
  6. ^ive been told cooler water helps fish retain black. My pond is in partial/sometimes full shade so the pond stays around the low 70s.
  7. I also do not use melafix or pimafix. My time in the betta community has taught me not to use them and honestly I think that in most cases as Amanda has said, salt and clean water do equally as good a job. Prazi is the best med to focus on when QTing new fish (as it is gentle focuses on removing parasites) and then if you see signs of illness you can treat for it after the fact, rather than before. Here's to an uneventful QT!
  8. About your concerns with sand I'd love to point you to this article I've written! As well as stating that sand will pass through the gut easily and with no issues. Sand is the most 'natural' substrate you can provide for them and keeping a small sandbed is much better than gravel imo. Fish love to forage through it as well!
  9. Agreed natural sun helps hold colors the best (and I've been told by a breeder cooler water helps as well but I'm not sure how true this is). My black Ranchu is holding his black very well and has for the past year and he is outdoors in my pond.
  10. I'd just like to pop in and add that you can definitely see scale raising on pearlscales just like any other fish. And that in the beginning of dropsy you will not always have blisters (both Ushi and Roos never had blistering when they were prickly). You want to look for raising scales on the curve of the tummy and the peduncle as this is where it's easiest to see raised scales. While you're treating her Id suggest making the water depth 6-7in to ease the pressure on the swim bladder. I really like using cement mixing tubs as QT tubs because they have good dimensions, are cheap and come in a few sizes (typically 10 and 20 gals).
  11. I'd just like to pop in and add that you can definitely see scale raising on pearlscales just like any other fish. And that in the beginning of dropsy you will not always have blisters (both Ushi and Roos never had blistering when they were prickly). You want to look for raising scales on the curve of the tummy and the peduncle as this is where it's easiest to see raised scales. While you're treating her Id suggest making the water depth 6-7in to ease the pressure on the swim bladder. I really like using cement mixing tubs as QT tubs because they have good dimensions, are cheap and come in a few sizes (typically 10 and 20 gals).
  12. Is just like to add that I've used metal sinkers (unsure if they're lead) more than a couple times and they never bother my snails. I typically just leave them in for a few days so the plants can root and then remove them.
  13. They flop in captivity due to spending more time near the surface. It's just a cosmetic thing. As it is in goldfish.
  14. I know ... I would be terrified to spend a lot of money on a fish for this very reason. Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk Just don't look at it as an investment. I mean as with all living things the fish is going to die at some point. If you paid a lot for a fish that's money you're never getting back regardless! you just have to make the best of it.
  15. 150 is my most expensive and that was before shipping. :x
  16. It's scales look completely flat to me?
  17. Yes, most Ranchu breeders, judges, etc. would regard this as a flawed fish. I agree with Helen's answer. However, we as collectors can love and appreciate any fish regardless of official standards The Lionhead is the original Chinese dorsaless fish. An ideal Lionhead has a straight back and it's head is large in proportion to it's body. There should also be considerable, bumpy headgrowth. The tail leaves the peduncle at a gentle angle and there is no tuck. The Ranchu is the refined Japanese version of the original dorsaless breed. They cultivated and bred fish with rounder backs and tight tail tucks. An ideal Ranchu has a smooth arched back, a smaller head proportion to the body and less wen. The wen is also smoother than that of a Lionhead. Finally, the tail should leave the peduncle at a sharp angle. Of course, there are many blends of these breeds such as the Lionchu which show traits of both fish. When you started talking about Ranchu it should be clear you're describing a side view Ranchu which is actually developed in China. Japan has developed the top view Ranchu. They have a totally different set of traits and things like tail tuck and sloping of the back are not as important because the animal is only Bred to be viewed from above. They're less round when viewed from above and should be kind of an oblong shape. The head growth is very important, especially the "cheeks" which are known as the funtan. The splay of the tail and how strong it is also defines a good TVR. (Red and white is a TVR and orange is a SVR) Just wanted to clear that up!
  18. My Anubias have all grown down whatever they're attached to and into my substrate (flourite). They put out leaves a lot faster than any Anubias I've noticed.
  19. Resealing is easy! The hardest part is getting the silicone off tbh and cleaning it up. The tank looks nice, I hope it cleans up well for you!
  20. aaww once your planted tank is more established, you should get one. in my limited experience of owning pearlies, they do not appear the type to be ripping plants out.. although PSP could prolly tell you more about that They are goldfish, what do you think?! :rofl In all seriousness though they rarely touch my plants. Sometimes they pull up new plants on accident with their tubby bodies but other than that they tend to leave things alone.
  21. They look so great Helen!! I love Ballerina, what a special and cute girl. I can't wait to see them grow big and healthy in your care
  22. You may not always see clear segmentation on a leech as many of the segments are internal. Definitely look like leaches to me but seeing as only 70% of leeches are parasitic you probably have a free living species. Even leeches that do feed on blood only take a blood meal 2-3 times per year as blood is very difficult to digest. Keep them as pets! Or feed them to the fish. They're harmless.
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