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Pearlscaleperfect

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Everything posted by Pearlscaleperfect

  1. Don't most people run at least a stock tank heater in their ponds when it gets really cold? But that's not correct either, really. Fancies can handle really crappy water just as well as singletailed fish. Just ask all of us who started out with fancies in tiny tanks and no knowledge of the nitrogen cycle. Most people don't keep fancies outside in the northeast, let alone in a stock tub. I had a few people tell me even with a heater the tub would freeze solid. I only own 4 Singletails (one of which is half ryukin) the rest are fancies. And they did just as well as the Singletails during winter.
  2. Actually, fantails and other fancies can be just as hardy as singletails. I know of a few fancy fish that live in outdoor ponds year round in Michigan, where it is very cold in the winter. They do just fine. Yea tell my fancies they aren't hardy after the coldest winter on record in the past 100 years. Yours too. I believe that you have some of the hardiest fancies on the planet. Who says pearlies, teles, and ranchu can't survive the polar vortex? To be fair the pond was heated. BUT it did get quite cold. Colder than most people think it's appropriate to keep fancies at. And we had probably the snowiest winter in my lifetime. I was mainly talking about water quality [emoji23] how cold did your pond get? Before my heater arrived it got down to the low 40s. After the heater it stayed around 50.
  3. Actually, fantails and other fancies can be just as hardy as singletails. I know of a few fancy fish that live in outdoor ponds year round in Michigan, where it is very cold in the winter. They do just fine. Yea tell my fancies they aren't hardy after the coldest winter on record in the past 100 years. Yours too. I believe that you have some of the hardiest fancies on the planet. Who says pearlies, teles, and ranchu can't survive the polar vortex? To be fair the pond was heated. BUT it did get quite cold. Colder than most people think it's appropriate to keep fancies at. And we had probably the snowiest winter in my lifetime.
  4. Actually, fantails and other fancies can be just as hardy as singletails. I know of a few fancy fish that live in outdoor ponds year round in Michigan, where it is very cold in the winter. They do just fine. Yea tell my fancies they aren't hardy after the coldest winter on record in the past 100 years.
  5. That stocking should be based on length alone. This is a big thing that gets passed around here, stocking should be based first on the weight of the fish as that will directly correlate to the amount of metabolic wastes it produces. A 8inch ranchu and an 8inch comet (total length not standard) are going to be vastly different weights and should be treated as such. After taking into account the weight of the fish then you should ensure that you have the right dimensions in which to house it comfortably. Stunting. Stunting as people tend to think of it does not exist. Goldfish's organs will not continue to grow while they stay small. It's not how stunting works and any period of stunting a fish typically can rebound from with no issues. A small fish = a stunted fish. Completely untrue. Size variation is incredibly wide even in one single goldfish spawn. You will have larger fish and small fish. I'm sure I'll think of more later
  6. I'd like to point out that sand getting 'stuck to the fish' is not problematic in the slightest. It just gets stuck to their slime coat and in no way irritates them. Sand is the carps natural substrate and it's important to remember this. Smaller gravel does concern me because if it is small enough to be ingested it can cause internal issues such as a blockage or tear in the GI tract. A fish will not choke unless the gravel lodges itself in such a way that it prevents the mouth from functioning properly which would hold the gills shut. I'd say my fish certainly seem to 'enjoy' sand more. They spend more times sifting through it because it's much easier than sifting through gravel. Definitely not condoning gravel as it can be a fine substrate if you're dedicated to cleaning it thoroughly, just giving my information and input. Oh yes, my fish definitely seemed to enjoy sifting through the sand. It was also fun to see them rake it through their gills and spit it out. [emoji4] As far as irritation goes, I want to clarify that I did not observe any signs of this in my fish even though they were covered in sand. However, I still wanted to mention it because in this recent thread Red thought the sand being stuck to the slime coat was irritating one of her fish: http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/118142-back-to-sand/page-2 She observed flashing and other signs of discomfort, and this behavior stopped as soon as she removed the sand. I don't know if this was a coincidence or not, but it is interesting that the fish's condition improved immediately afterward - unless it could have been caused by something else related to that particular sand, but a lot of people use TMS so I don't know. The sand I had is similar to TMS and by the same manufacturer, but is even finer. It seems purely coincidental to me. :/ it's just important to not spread around misinformation. A while back someone started claiming that their sand irritated the gills of their fish (which is also untrue). I don't want this to become one of those things. I'm my trying to attack or admonish you in any way. This is just something I like to reiterateNo worries - I definitely want someone to let me know if something I say is incorrect, since that's how we learn! [emoji1] I did not see any comments in that thread disagreeing or saying that it was unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand itself, so I had figured it was a reasonable conclusion. It can be difficult to distinguish fact from myth in this hobby because so much of what is said is based on people's own observations.So are you saying that it would still be unlikely that the flashing was caused by the sand even if the sand was somewhat sharp (which seemed to be one of her concerns, along with the fineness of it - but your article said fineness wasn't a problem)? I just read your article and it was very informative - always nice to read something that further explains an issue based on science. [emoji4] It would be great to have a list of common fishkeeping myths, since there seem to be so many! Seems like I learn about a new one every month. [emoji33] I don't want to negate Reds observations and say it wasn't the sand but I'd be willing to bet it was an issue with that batch of sand or something else entirely. I've never noted issues with even very fine sands. I have had moonlight in a few tanks for a few years and I've had fish get covered in it while sifting through it. They seem to enjoy themselves. My point is we shouldn't fear sand or any other substrate, or admonish it, without solid evidence to support a claim. I still think sand is the substrate best suited for goldfish based on their ancestral carps habitat and their current anatomy.
  7. Id like to point put that in an article I've posted here I point out exactly what size substrate qualifies as sand and is the most easily consumed and passable.
  8. I'd like to point out that sand getting 'stuck to the fish' is not problematic in the slightest. It just gets stuck to their slime coat and in no way irritates them. Sand is the carps natural substrate and it's important to remember this. Smaller gravel does concern me because if it is small enough to be ingested it can cause internal issues such as a blockage or tear in the GI tract. A fish will not choke unless the gravel lodges itself in such a way that it prevents the mouth from functioning properly which would hold the gills shut. I'd say my fish certainly seem to 'enjoy' sand more. They spend more times sifting through it because it's much easier than sifting through gravel. Definitely not condoning gravel as it can be a fine substrate if you're dedicated to cleaning it thoroughly, just giving my information and input. Oh yes, my fish definitely seemed to enjoy sifting through the sand. It was also fun to see them rake it through their gills and spit it out. [emoji4] As far as irritation goes, I want to clarify that I did not observe any signs of this in my fish even though they were covered in sand. However, I still wanted to mention it because in this recent thread Red thought the sand being stuck to the slime coat was irritating one of her fish: http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/forum/index.php?/topic/118142-back-to-sand/page-2 She observed flashing and other signs of discomfort, and this behavior stopped as soon as she removed the sand. I don't know if this was a coincidence or not, but it is interesting that the fish's condition improved immediately afterward - unless it could have been caused by something else related to that particular sand, but a lot of people use TMS so I don't know. The sand I had is similar to TMS and by the same manufacturer, but is even finer. It seems purely coincidental to me. :/ it's just important to not spread around misinformation. A while back someone started claiming that their sand irritated the gills of their fish (which is also untrue). I don't want this to become one of those things. I'm my trying to attack or admonish you in any way. This is just something I like to reiterate
  9. I'd just say beefcake is a ryukin with a less prominent hump. But definitely looks like a ryukin to me.
  10. I'd like to point out that sand getting 'stuck to the fish' is not problematic in the slightest. It just gets stuck to their slime coat and in no way irritates them. Sand is the carps natural substrate and it's important to remember this. Smaller gravel does concern me because if it is small enough to be ingested it can cause internal issues such as a blockage or tear in the GI tract. A fish will not choke unless the gravel lodges itself in such a way that it prevents the mouth from functioning properly which would hold the gills shut. I'd say my fish certainly seem to 'enjoy' sand more. They spend more times sifting through it because it's much easier than sifting through gravel. Definitely not condoning gravel as it can be a fine substrate if you're dedicated to cleaning it thoroughly, just giving my information and input.
  11. They all look great Mikey! You've done a good job with them
  12. The first is without a doubt a ryukin. Note the wedge shaped head and the hump beginning to form. The second is a fantail. Rounded face with no evidence of division between the head and body (like the hump of a ryukin). Both lovely fish.
  13. I keep postponing ordering a ton but with weekly large changes on the pond I really need to keep a literal ton of the stuff
  14. The black opals are nice! I've seen that coloration on quite a few fancies from China. Hoping it becomes more prevalent in the states.
  15. I have used both and also prefer super green. I think it's a great formula for older goldfish in particular. I do supplement with FBW and pellets.
  16. He does not look like the true albino fish I've seen but he could very well be leucistic to some extent.
  17. Was this from the same store as your last fish?
  18. Do you have enough for more than one person? I'd love some
  19. The only playsand I bought from Home Depot was basically white. So I'm not much help! For gold sands I love my sunset gold by caribsea.
  20. Fair enough; but, if I may ask, why would a real piece of driftwood not encourage anaerobic pockets?Because by nature many driftwoods are hardwoods that do not break down easily. And you can choose a piece that has no open holes or pockets vs a hollow fake driftwood. Okay...But wouldn't "stuff" still accumulate under a solid piece of (real) wood? To a degree but not as much as a hollow ornament would accumulate. Every few waterchanges I just pick mine up and make sure it's clean underneath. It's very easy.
  21. Fair enough; but, if I may ask, why would a real piece of driftwood not encourage anaerobic pockets? Because by nature many driftwoods are hardwoods that do not break down easily. And you can choose a piece that has no open holes or pockets vs a hollow fake driftwood.
  22. Yes I'm referring to a piece of driftwood sold by a petstore. They are easy to disinfect and clean and you won't have to worry about paint chipping or anaerobic pockets. I think in the end you have to sit down and realize that you may have to compromise a bit on your decor ideal to do what is best suites for your fish.
  23. Ditch the gravel imo. It's just not worth the hassle! Why not just get a similar looking piece of real driftwood and use some sand?
  24. The tank looks wonderful! Love your giant monsters as well
  25. I think a white dot is a bit different from a sore. I'd love to see a picture if you can manage to get one, or a video even. Just to rule out that its not something more serious
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