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blackteles

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  1. At the advice of some well respected telescope breeders I've recently removed any air strips and air wands that I previously used and have changed to exclusively using the large Hagen Elite bubble disks in my three telescope tanks. The air strips were creating entirely too much current and were actually creating additional stress to my telescopes by fighting excessive water movement. Second, by using these disks I've eliminated any possible sharp edges which is a potential hazard of eye injuries and cuts/scrapes which can lead to possible bacterial infections. The rounded edges will eliminate any such hazards. I've seen many complaints and have experienced the frustration myself of how to get these bubble disks to stay flat on the bottom of the tank. I've worked with these for a while and have come up with an easy way to get the disks to stay flat on the bottom. I power mine using Whisper 60 pumps which perform quietly and provide all the necessary air pressure that you need. 1. Most importantly, after removing the bubble disk from the packaging place the disk on the bottom of your tank and let it soak for a 12 hour period. This will condition the air stone and help remove air from the stone. 2. Use flexible standard airline tubing. Don't use the semi-rigid type of tubing as you'll need as much flexibility as possible. 3. Before setup of the disk, be sure to install a check valve within the airline to protect your air pump from water back flow. 4. Use 3 to 4 of the airline suction cups to secure the airline into place either to the side or the rear of the aquarium. Slide these over the airline before attaching the bubble disk to the end of the airline going into the tank. 5. Start by forcing the tubing tightly onto the connector of the bubble disk. The connector flange is slightly larger than the tubing itself so force will be necessary to get the tubing over the flange and will offer a tight fit without any gaps. 6. Work the disk into the airline and twist gently to position the disk level on the bottom of the tank. 7. Position and attach the airline suction cups in place along the inside of the tank in order to keep the airline tight against the edge of the tank. Keeping it tight against the sides will eliminate the possibility of of a fish becoming trapped within it. 8. When running a smaller tank such as a 29-30 gallon, I've found it necessary to also add an adjustable flow valve to keep a comfortable flow of air into the tank without creating undue stress. Larger tanks of 40 gallons plus shouldn't need a flow valve installed. I've attached a video of all 3 of my telescope tanks that each have the large bubble disks in place to give you an idea of disk and suction cup placement. Again, the most important factor to get these to stay in place is to condition the disk by soaking in your tank for at least a 12 hour period. The airline suction cups will then assist in holding the disk down and keep it from moving or floating. I keep one large disk positioned at one front corner of each tank. Each one provides more than enough aeration and surface agitation to keep my telescopes healthy. Hope this helps! This post has been promoted to an article
  2. At the advice of some well respected telescope breeders I've recently removed any air strips and air wands that I previously used and have changed to exclusively using the large Hagen Elite bubble disks in my three telescope tanks. The air strips were creating entirely too much current and were actually creating additional stress to my telescopes by fighting excessive water movement. Second, by using these disks I've eliminated any possible sharp edges which is a potential hazard of eye injuries and cuts/scrapes which can lead to possible bacterial infections. The rounded edges will eliminate any such hazards. I've seen many complaints and have experienced the frustration myself of how to get these bubble disks to stay flat on the bottom of the tank. I've worked with these for a while and have come up with an easy way to get the disks to stay flat on the bottom. I power mine using Whisper 60 pumps which perform quietly and provide all the necessary air pressure that you need. 1. Most importantly, after removing the bubble disk from the packaging place the disk on the bottom of your tank and let it soak for a 12 hour period. This will condition the air stone and help remove air from the stone. 2. Use flexible standard airline tubing. Don't use the semi-rigid type of tubing as you'll need as much flexibility as possible. 3. Before setup of the disk, be sure to install a check valve within the airline to protect your air pump from water back flow. 4. Use 3 to 4 of the airline suction cups to secure the airline into place either to the side or the rear of the aquarium. Slide these over the airline before attaching the bubble disk to the end of the airline going into the tank. 5. Start by forcing the tubing tightly onto the connector of the bubble disk. The connector flange is slightly larger than the tubing itself so force will be necessary to get the tubing over the flange and will offer a tight fit without any gaps. 6. Work the disk into the airline and twist gently to position the disk level on the bottom of the tank. 7. Position and attach the airline suction cups in place along the inside of the tank in order to keep the airline tight against the edge of the tank. Keeping it tight against the sides will eliminate the possibility of of a fish becoming trapped within it. 8. When running a smaller tank such as a 29-30 gallon, I've found it necessary to also add an adjustable flow valve to keep a comfortable flow of air into the tank without creating undue stress. Larger tanks of 40 gallons plus shouldn't need a flow valve installed. I've attached a video of all 3 of my telescope tanks that each have the large bubble disks in place to give you an idea of disk and suction cup placement. Again, the most important factor to get these to stay in place is to condition the disk by soaking in your tank for at least a 12 hour period. The airline suction cups will then assist in holding the disk down and keep it from moving or floating. I keep one large disk positioned at one front corner of each tank. Each one provides more than enough aeration and surface agitation to keep my telescopes healthy. Hope this helps!
  3. Way to go Dee Dee! Nice job on your new purchase! Go Velveeta!
  4. Went down to my favorite lfs last night with my daughter and we picked up a large bubble disc for my 60, 16 ft. of airline, and a pack of connectors. We checked out their GF tanks as well, they had a lot of Lionheads, small Black Moors, and a tank of Urkel's.
  5. Very nice GF's that you have there, mary-beth! Great choices! I'm impressed with your black butterfly! Way to go on your DO's!
  6. All of mine are on the floor where they produce the least amount of noise. Even though they're well beneath the water line, as long as you have a check valve installed in each air line you'll have zero problems.
  7. LOL sometimes it's better just to crack a Mike's and forget about the whole thing lol :alc
  8. Hiya Miss Fang! Good question. Ken sets his reserve prices obviously before his auctions start. I've spoken with some people that said they had not met the reserve price when they bid and had been contacted by Ken through e-mail with a counter offer which was close to what the BIN price was. It just comes down to what Ken needs to get out of each fish. Hope that helps!
  9. Way to go Susan! Great score! I like that one! This being my first experience with Tommy I haven't seen any issues at all so far but remember I'm only into week #1. Mine are doing awesome so far and everything went well with the complete transaction. I'm sold on goldfishnet.
  10. Yah I'm seeing Dee Dee going back for that one.....
  11. I'm presently using Prazi and .1% salt as I did with my last batch of new blacks and the cycle is always uninterrupted.
  12. Deja vu! Rocky's just askin' for a piece of Tuff.......just sayin. Nice job Aussie!
  13. Looking pretty awesome there dude! Go Team Alex!
  14. Nice job Koko! The group looks great!
  15. Hey Miss Koko....sorry about that. I had it set to private and just reset it. It'll work now for ya! lol the stick!
  16. You've got a great looking group, Alex! Keep up the good work!
  17. Kaytee, I agree with Alex on your pH questton. It's never an issue to move from a low pH to a high pH. It's when you add fish from a high pH to a low pH that can shock them. A sudden drop in pH of 2 points or more will definitely shock and kill goldfish.
  18. Not much you can do....ya never know what you're gonna get!
  19. It's not often that I get a chance to receive two shipments of telescopes from two different suppliers but yesterday happened to end up like that. I had one shipment of two black Broadtail Moors come from Tommy Hui and the second was a shipment of two black Butterfly Teles from Ken at DO. (Molly saw them before I did!) The two Broadtails are a male by the name of Xen and the female is named Cleopatra (as instructed by Helen). The two Butterflly Teles are, I believe, a male by the name Vion and a female by the name of Niko. All four are younger specimens and show great potential. Anyway, here's some pics and a video of the process. All of the mini bubbles in the tank are from the addition of Prazi and it gave the photos a nice effect so I'm stickin' with it! Enjoy! Two is better than one! Opening Tommy's box with the Broadtails The DO bags right out of the box Tommy's Broadtails in green water Temperature acclimation
  20. LOL thanks Miss Fang. Hey, it's one appendage at a time here.
  21. I had the opportunity to receive two shipments of blacks from two different suppliers yesterday morning and thought it would be interesting to share the results and differences of the water within the shipping bags. One shipment came from Tommy at goldfishnet and the other from Ken at DO. Once they arrived the bags were placed in the QT tank to equalize the temperature for a 30 minute period. The bags were then opened and each fish was immediately transferred to a fresh water dip tank of equal temperature. After a period of 15 minutes in the fresh water they again were moved into QT with 0.1% salt and Prazi. The final result this time was much better than the previous shipment I received with a definite reduction in stress to the fish. Both shipments were phenomenal....my thanks to both Tommy and Ken. Box #1- Goldfishnet from TX (note these fish were shipped in green water) Ammonia 1.0 pH low 6.2 Nitrates 0.5 Nitrites 0.5 KH low 40 ppm GH soft 75 ppm Box #2- Dandy Orandas from MI Ammonia 4.0 pH moderate alkaline 7.8 Nitrates 0.0 Nitrites 0.0 KH high 300 ppm GH very hard 300 ppm
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