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Barney

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  1. Thanks for the replies! To clarify, this is a solid wood cabinet, not pressboard. I do see what you're saying about the weight going to the edges. Wouldn't the board on top distribute the weight over the cabinet? We used a similar design for about 5 years with a 40 gallon tank. I haven't noticed any problems with it, but this is a lot more weight which is why I'm trying to be careful. We'll reconsider and think about how to design it better. Thanks for the offer j-pond, I might take you up on it!
  2. Hi, my two shubunkins are moving up to a 75 gallon aquarium (from a 40). They're so excited. The tank didn't come with a stand, so I'm considering using a cabinet that's 14.5-15" wide (5' long). The tank is 18" wide (4' long). If I use an 18" wide board over the top of the cabinet, will that be strong enough? The cabinet is solid wood, but has legs which I think I'll remove. I'm a little concerned about this much weight, so any advice is appreciated!
  3. A lot of really good points Daryl. People willing to flush probably won't have healthy fish, or even care enough to call me. I really like the idea of fish days at the pet store, sometimes I cringe at what I hear people say when they pick out goldfish. I've been thinking about this all weekend. I put an ad on Freecycle to see what might be out there and lined up two ten gallon tanks as a start for quarantine. I'd like to run a small rescue, just take occasional goldfish when I have the space. But of course these things can take on a life of their own. My husband (who loves the idea) asked "what will you do if there are 50 fish left over from the fair, if you don't take them, they get flushed.". How can I say no? But learning to say no sometimes is so important in rescue. Kristi, your rainbow shark is beautiful! Chuck, I saw the Monster Fish site. He's doing a good thing. He also had some helpful information on his website. Thanks! Ranchugirl, thank you for the link. Maybe I can talk to someone there and see what issues made them decide to close the rescue. Thanks everyone for all of the comments and things to think about!!
  4. Thank you for all of the input! Chichidongo, I definitely see your point. That's one of the things I've considered, will this take over my life and I'll wish I had never started? How often did you get calls for rescue? Did you have to turn fish away? But, I feel like my calling has always been to save animals. In the last few years it's really been nagging at me to get going on it. I'd love to start a dog and cat rescue (I've been volunteering for years), but I don't have the facilities to have more, even temporarily. I won't be able to save every goldfish and will have to have limits, but if I can save a few I'll feel I'm doing something. I can't tell you how my heart sank when I learned about my relative's fish. This was a beautiful, large, healthy white goldfish. She actually offered it to me and I said I was interested, but couldn't take it that day (having no idea it's time was short). I never heard more about it and just learned over Christmas that they flushed it. People who would never consider leaving a dog to die are willing to do it to the fish they were once excited to bring home. Newbiefishgirl, I love your ideas. I thought this could go beyond rescuing fish, but also encourage responsible pet ownership, provide public education about goldfish, etc.. I'm not beyond activism either, such as organizing protests outside of fairs and carnivals if goldfish are being given away. I'll give this more thought and try to visualize the day to day operation (and what it would cost). I really appreciate the encouragement and support!
  5. Well, after learning that my SIL flushed her beautiful white goldfish (which I would have gladly taken), I started thinking about starting a goldfish rescue group. Basically posting on Craig's List or other sites, asking people to surrender their goldfish instead of flushing them. I have a small house but could fit more tanks. The idea would be to adopt larger goldfish out to new homes (with a contract requiring a lifelong home or return). The benefit to adopters is that they could find larger goldfish that are more likely to be healthy. This would either be a total flop (sorry, no pun intended) or I'd be overrun. I'm involved in other animal rescue, but can't say I've ever come across a goldfish rescue group. I have experience grant writing so I'm even considering becoming a non-profit so I could ask for donations and grants. Obviously some concerns would be: Determining the radius I'd rescue in, probably only 10-20 miles from home to save the fish the stress of transport (although flushing must be worse). Having enough tanks to allow quarantine while fish are observed for diseases. Having enough tank space to allow at least 10 gallons each. Determining whether I'd take other fresh water fish or just goldfish. Determining when I'd try to save a sick fish or offer humane ideas at euthanasia instead (clove oil). Finding adopters or pet stores to rehome rescued fish eventually. I'd love to hear from anyone who knows of a group or has done something similar. I can't stand the thought of people flushing. I let my poor niece hear it when she smiled about him being flushed. But you could see something changing in her eyes when I told her what probably happened to him. He didn't swim out to the lake to live a happy life.
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