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  1. First we attack the koi clay cos we think it’s a bag of food… then we cuddle it.
    3 points
  2. I agree. They are more like a library than any other kind of platform. I sure hope we can keep going. For me its heart breaking. I mean I been hosting it for 21 years now. It like a child to me. I don't want to loose it. But you know you got to feed your family first.
    3 points
  3. Personally I’ve kept telescopes with other varieties including singletails successfully, problems only usually arise when occasionally a more aggressive or territorial fish comes about. You’ll probably have a while yet before having to worry about an upgrade.
    2 points
  4. Guppy and medaka besties!
    2 points
  5. I believe that is the case with those larger imported fish. How can a fish that is less than a year old be 5 inches in length unless some heavy feedings/hormones are in playhere
    2 points
  6. My color-changing ranchu, Bubbles, just turned 5 years old! (Every time I post his photo, he's changed color again!) Bubbles has lost most all of his orange coloring this year (except for a spot of orange on top) so now he's basically all white. He has just the tiniest bit of a wen, which is okay with me. I've been feeding him mostly Omega One medium goldfish pellets, although I occasionally give him a few blood worms and shelled peas for a special snack. I've had to remove much of the fine black Tahitian sand in his tank, because it gets stuck in the filter and is super hand to keep clean. Bubbles loves to dig in the sand and pile it around the tank. Since the plants are only held down by rocks, I often find the plants floating around the tank, as a result of Bubbles' "redecorating" efforts. The plants (java ferns and anubias) are doing very well with the LED full spectrum lights - so well that I have to keep trimming them back because they fill up the tank so quickly, especially the ferns! The biggest challenge in taking care of Bubbles is finding the time to do regular water changes. It takes about 2 hours to empty the tank, clean everything, and then refill it. I have to carry a 2.5 gallon bucket back and forth from the laundry room sink to the fish tank at opposite ends of our house. Does anyone else have stories (and photos) of their older/mature ranchus to share?
    2 points
  7. My guys were busy this morning.
    2 points
  8. Here they are. My favorite dinky man is Bayana... The little white one. He is 4-5 years old despite being small. The other man is Boss. He is 2-3 years old. Both are pet quality short tailed Ryukins.
    2 points
  9. He’s most likely been surface gulping and swallowed air. The colour is probably from swallowing substrate etc, just keep an eye on him.
    2 points
  10. I concur... And so does Mary. I have had Mary for a few years and as he got older, he got meaner. He is unable to have tank mates now. He attacks anything that moves in his tank and generally stresses other fish to death or beats them up. He also bites any hands or tools that enter his tank. He lives in a 55 by himself and that's how it'll be until he passes away. I love Mary but his little temper makes me say NO to Blood Parrots ever again. I am not a fan of a 55 gallon with just one orange smelly fish.
    2 points
  11. 6/3/2021 - 6/30/2021 Hello, I'm giving away ONE pendent that I made with Acrylic paint. The winner will be able to choose from this set I made. It doesn't have a chain. Every post is an entry into the drawing. Winner will be drawn on July First 2021 by a random number generator. Winner pays shipping. I will send you a pm to get your address and Paypal information. Good Luck.
    2 points
  12. I’m so glad it helped! Many of the problems we see on this forum are husbandry and water quality problems. Goldfish are somewhat unique that way, in that they’re both very widely kept fish but also have some surprising unique issues with waste production and water quality that the standard advice for tropical fish keeping doesn’t address. Water testing, LARGE regular water changes, and filter maintenance are the most critical factors for their help. Along with proper quarantine procedures with new livestock you can avoid almost all illness with them. Goldfish keepers are water keepers first and foremost. If your water quality is kept in top shape that keeps everything else running smoothly. Knocking junk from the filters (never toss the media unless it’s disintegrating, always just rinse the filter pads in old tank water and hit them against the sides of a bucket to knock poop free) is the only big maintenance required beyond water changes and regular testing to make sure your nitrates haven’t climbed. High nitrates aren’t as instantly toxic to the fish as nitrites and ammonia but they still cause harm and weaken the fish’s immune system when they’re persistently high. But they can climb without any symptoms for a long time and to very high levels if you aren’t looking for it. Especially in a small tank, large and frequent water changes and testing before those water changes to make sure you’re not climbing beyond about 20 ppms of nitrate is really important. It saves so much drama and heartache
    2 points
  13. Praziquantel - powdered prazi is my favorite, easily obtained. https://smithcreekfishfarm.com/products/prazi-power-praziquantel-powder You dose it in several weeks of rounds, four days in the aquarium and three days out. The rounds give any fluke eggs a chance to hatch out. Usually three rounds is sufficient to drop the fluke load to almost nothing, though it’s almost impossible to completely eliminate gill flukes in Goldfish if they have ever been exposed. It’s a very safe medication and considered preventative annual care, but be aware some fish get pouty and bottom sit during prazi. This is normal and a sign that fish needed the treatment!
    2 points
  14. Wow your fish are looking great! Its good to see you again! This is my tank with the new lights. Still need to add some more anubias and I want to pull that biggest one in the middle forward a bit so the leaves stop getting caught in the overflow lol. I'm loving this tank so much. So easy to change/rinse the sponge in the sump when needed (I rinse the coarser ones in tank water and change the fine filter wool). And so easy to do waterchanges.
    2 points
  15. I once had goldfish that just looooved tangerines for some reason. The right food is out there somewhere (;
    2 points
  16. Okay I just had to comment because Mel is huge! Sending him well wishes!
    2 points
  17. That is fantastic! Good on you for putting so much effort into saving you fish! Please keep us updated and good luck!
    2 points
  18. Given the way it’s bulging more on one side than the other, it could very well be a tumor of blockage. Is this fish eating and pooping? Our normal diagnostic form is for tanks and not ponds, but I need as many details about his history and your environment and treatments as you can give me, please. Test Results for the Following: * Ammonia Level(Tank) * Nitrite Level(Tank) * Nitrate level(Tank) * Ammonia Level(Tap) * Nitrite Level(Tap) * Nitrate level(Tap) * Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) * Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) Other Required Info: * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? * Water temperature? * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? * How often do you change the water and how much? * How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? * How many fish in the tank and their size? * What kind of water additives or conditioners? * What do you feed your fish and how often? * Any new fish added to the tank? * Any medications added to the tank? * List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment. * Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?
    2 points
  19. WOWsers that was a lot of fun.
    2 points
  20. I don't know how she died. It was sudden. Also I got a new shirt from Wish. Amazingly it is great. It is green with the number 12 on it. It also has a name on the back of it.
    2 points
  21. My husband’s 23 year old Saturn is at 245k miles and still going strong, but he’s had to put a lot of maintenance into it over the years. It’s a good car and he adores it, but I’d personally have traded for a new model already 😜
    2 points
  22. I would also maybe suggest removing the gravel, or at least make a much thinner layer of it. Doing that will make cleaning 10x easier for you
    2 points
  23. It looks good! In a tank that size I’d be going 1-2x per week, 80% changes. Your water tests will tell you if that’s frequent enough, if your nitrates are climbing above 10 ppms from water change to water change that means you should probably step it up to twice per week, and make sure to knock out your mechanical filter media monthly.
    2 points
  24. Yes to all that you say Fishy Man: Water changes are a great tonic for our little ponds. Just today as I finished with a nearly 90+ % water change of main koi pond noted that some of my cement work still drying on filter and stream bed was being washed in pond from sudden rain showers . Although a little cement should not produce any great harm I choose prudent course and now will do another complete water change. Sounds easy yes? But to do my pond requires several hours even with good evac pumps and nice we’ll supply.up side is we now begin breed season and water changes have produced wonders for spawn activity in past times.
    2 points
  25. My recommendation is to just keep a sack of the crushed coral in a five gallon bucket, leaching in throughout the week. Add that to each water change and you’ve already supplemented some of what was lost. Little swings in hardness aren’t the end of the world, especially if you’re also buffering with baking soda - which is easy to mix in each water change and keep things steadier. That’s my recommendation, a mix of the slower leaching buffers like the wonder shells and aragonite along with a chemical additive like the sodium bicarb to help with the pH and buffering more quickly. Acidic soft water is very tough for goldfish if it isn’t stable, and it’s difficult to stabilize. I don’t envy you that, but you’re on the right track.
    2 points
  26. Here's the latest. I stopped the Melafix and Pimafix as they didn't seem to be helping anything. After looking around here more, I also stopped using charcoal in the filter. The water seems cleaner and the fish seem happier. I then gave them a 7 day course of Fritz Maracyn (tetracycline) with water refreshes and doses of Hikari Ich-X on days 1, 5, and 7. They've now been unmedicated for about a week. The fin tissue that was being torn up by the red streaks has already regrown to its normal shape and the redness is fading. I'm thinking it's now scar tissue and no longer an active infection. At this point, I'm sticking with the water refresh twice a week with no charcoal and they seem to be doing well. Fingers crossed.
    2 points
  27. I stopped by to see how you were doing, and donated! I can't thank you enough for all the help and joy you've given me over the years, Koko. hopefully my little bit can help keep you up and running ♥️♥️ - Sarah H. (aka ryukingirl)
    2 points
  28. Here I found very intresting idea/hack way regarding leaking issue from the canister body. It may be useful for some of us.
    2 points
  29. Hi everyone! I'm kinda new here but not really, I just never really posted anything (shame on me) So I decided to show off my pond! I had an orange fantail and an all white oranda when I was 16, I didn't know what I was doing at the time, but I loved them so much. Unfortunately they didn't last more than a year and I was too upset to get new ones. My love for goldfish came back this year when I went to a fish store to buy guppies for a 25 gal mini pond, and the store employee convinced me to buy goldfish instead, so I wouldn't need a heater. Of course, I was like YES!! I'll take the goldfish instead, but after I left the shop with 4 tiny pearlscales, I started doing my research on them, and realized how I messed up on the tank size. Fast forward to today, I have 5 fish (2 of the original pearlscales, a crown pearlscales and two orandas), I lived and breathed studying about goldfish this whole time, and also pond designing, because I wanted to give these guys the best life. We finally finished building our pond recently and it's currently cycling. We just need to make the rest of the yard this nice! It has two oversized bog filters, an automatic water change system and 625 gallons in the middle. The waterflow is very gentle for these guys, I have an aerator I want to add after the dirt settles. I live in zone 10a so winters aren't so harsh, but I want to provide them with a heat gradient anyway, specially because the 2 orandas I got have lived in 76F water their whole lives. I want them to live the best life possible! They already eat better quality food than I do. lol I could have up to about 20 fish probably, but I plan on going slow, hopefully no more than 10-15, and if I can't control myself, I will definitely up the filtration. My 5 babies will have a goldfish mansion all for themselves for a while though, at least until spring. Hope you guys like it, and of course I'm always open to helpful advice if you have any!
    2 points
  30. This is really simple and happens to a lot of us Simple put, your water changes are just too small to keep nitrates down. 50-80% weekly is a better choice, I usually just drain until the fish are barely covered with water and refill. They’re such big waste producers the numbers can really climb quickly if you’re not removing the waste and the wastewater often enough. It’s not really a filter maturity issue either, but it CAN be a filter maintenance issue. How often are you knocking free all the debris in your filter media and pads? Sometimes canisters, in particular, can be a pain to clean and end up becoming nitrate factories as the broken down fish waste still keeps producing nitrate as it sits in there. Please don’t feel badly - I am VERY careful with these things and ended up with a tropical tank last week with nitrates well over 100 ppms. One fish died and everyone else was acting totally normal. The issue was the same - I’d been doing water changes that were too small for the actual waste level and not testing my water often enough to catch it. So I have upped the frequency and water change volume, along with thoroughly knocking the poop from their sponge, and the rate is now down around 10 ppms, which is where we want it to stay once it is above 20 ppms it is time for filter maintenance and a big water change, that’s a good, safe guideline.
    2 points
  31. Okay, so you’re going to glue legos or something similar around the edge. Then take thin white fabric, like a pillow case or thin muslin quilting cotton, and your going to lay it over that light surface and spacers and pull it tight, then staple or glue to the top of the hood so you have a smooth glove of fabric around the lights, but not touching them. The fabric dims the intensity of the lights by at least 25% and cuts glare. I’m a fan of hot glue for this, since you only have to hold each section of fabric tight for about thirty seconds. But even clothespins or safety pins would work to see how you like it. Generally speaking, the glare only bothers the fish if they’re celestials or other upwardly turned eye fish, OR in a bare bottom tank. Substrate helps a lot. But if you need more diffuse light the fabric trick is by far the easiest.
    2 points
  32. Just from the picture it does look like a tumor. If you search past threads you can see we have had people leave them, try to operate, etc. The thing is, sometimes they grow slowly and sometimes they’re more aggressive and become a drag on the fish. My general advice is to wait until it’s making swimming difficult before trying surgical excision, but that’s your choice. if you press on the lump does it seem soft and blood fills or harder like a pea?
    2 points
  33. And man does the water get all milky looking too. 😱
    2 points
  34. They are probably remains from eggs, I find my tank always looks a mess after they lay eggs. The tiny white dots are probably left over patches of 'egg glue' as I call it, the eggs form a sticky surface that hardens so they attach to things like rocks, plants and the glass. When the goldfish eat the eggs you often see little spots where they were
    2 points
  35. If they are fertilized then in a couple of days you will be able to see the little eyes inside the eggs Otherwise they will turn white and get fuzzy. I often see eggs without seeing any chasing, but also see them with chasing. If they hatch, keep them in a shallow tub/tank. Daily waterchanges, when they are really small I like to use airline to drain and fill the tank so it doesn't disturb them too much. Or if I only have a couple I keep them in a small container and do tub to tub waterchanges (So I will have one tub ready with clean water and move them to that one, and then clean out the one they were in and set it up ready for them to go back in later) I don't use an airpump or filter until they are about a month old and then I just use a sponge filter. For the first day or two you wont need to feed them as they will still be absorbing their egg sac. After that you can feed them baby brine shrimp, decapsulated brine shrimp eggs (I found mine did really well on these), Daphnia (Frozen when they are small as I find its smaller for them to eat, when they get a bit bigger you can use live if you want to), Hikari first bites (or any other commerical fry food). I also like to put some plants in there that have algae on them for them to nibble on
    2 points
  36. I logged In and was like 👁👄👁 🤣🤣🤣
    1 point
  37. I dont really have leftover food and if I do i usually net it out (since the pond is only 2 ft deep) My goldfish love peas too and love their repashy gel food in the morning! Here are my photos
    1 point
  38. Have you tried live mosquito larva or small earthworms live. Most are also fond of fish eggs.
    1 point
  39. Salem says thank you! He’s technically my boyfriend’s cat but he is a handsome boy and quite the character! I adore him!
    1 point
  40. That's pretty cool! Koko, do you still have an Etsy store? I can't find it . . .
    1 point
  41. Hello, Now, I am no expert at goldfish illness, however I can help move things along, so those that are knowledgeable on goldfish illness can help you and your fish. So, now we are dealing with two things. One is getting your pond (and you) in good shape for success. You'll have to learn about keeping the pond in good health while being overstocked. That will include things like monitoring the water with your test kit, and making appropriate water changes when needed. This forum will help with that, as we have much solid info available with a simple search, also some awesome members who can help guide you along. You should also consider; if you are willing to work harder (monitoring, water changing), and enjoying more fish, OR if rehoming some fish and enjoying less monitoring and water changing would be better. The important thing to remember, is that you are caring for water. If you can keep the water healthy, you'll likely have healthy fish. The second thing we are dealing with, is the current (quarantine) tank you are keeping the sick fish in. You say the fish is looking worse. In order to help you and the fish, we now need to know the details of the current setup. Please fill out the form above (copy and paste again) with the info for the current setup. Important things to address: do you have a filter running on the tank with the sick fish? Are you treating the quarantine tank's water with a water conditioner? What is the Ammonia, PH, NitrIte, NitrAte, hardness of the quarantine tank's water? How many gallons? Again, I'm not an expert on illness, but this may be fixable with a simple salt treatment and healthy water. But I'd wait till a few other members chime in before taking action. For now, just get us the details on the current quarantine tank. Good Luck!
    1 point
  42. It made me think of a daphnia, or some sort of critter like that. But then I saw your dolphin Koko!
    1 point
  43. They are saying... "No photo's please, We are famous!" lol
    1 point
  44. Just got an aquarium hood. Now to change the aquascapping.
    1 point
  45. Ive used canister filters from the start and have to agree, they really are a pain. But, the fluval hob makes me a little nervous. I had one lose suction while i was away at work and it killed my one tank that had two nice fish that i had just got. Well, i did learn the importance of having enough air stone since that accident. Since then ive thought about getting an aqueon hob as that design seems less likely to lose suction. But, naturally since then my fluval hob has worked flawlessly. As for canister i like the kind for ponds that have backwash clean so theyre really easy to clean and you dont have to open them up. But theyre generally for really huge tanks or intened to be outside becuase the plumbing required to use them doesnt typically fit under normal sized aquariums and is a little unsightly. But im using one of these pond filters inside anyway. Its clunky looking and sits next to the stand but its a breeze to use. But long story short. Sure HOBs ftw.
    1 point
  46. It looks okay to me, honestly...? The luster of the scales can change with water conditions, but if it is velvet it is easier to diagnose under very bright light, up close.
    1 point
  47. Can’t thank you enough for all your help with this. You’ve been fantastic! Feeling much more confident about helping now that I have all your advice to reference, and clearer about the path forward and options we have available. Hopefully next time you hear from me will be to report on a healthy and happy goldfish! Thanks again. All the best and happy new year to you!
    1 point
  48. Hi there! I’m sorry he isn’t feeling well. First thing, if your mom is tossing her sponge filter regularly please encourage her to stop, that ruins the tank cycle and makes the water parameters go nuts. I’ve had the same sponges and filter pads for three years, the best maintenance is just squeezing them into the tank water change bucket to get out the solid poo and old food and then putting them back in, or giving bags of loose media a good whack against the side of the bucket or sink to dislodge the bits. Rinsing the sponges with tap water can cause issues because the chlorine can kill the beneficial bacteria we need to keep the water quality high, but a rinse in old tank water to get the poop out is fine. Second, it looks like the poor little guy has an infection, in which case antibiotics are the solution. We will need much more detailed information about the tank to know the best ones to choose, do you have a water testing kit available? API master test kit drops are the fave around here, and that will be critical to getting us more information about what might be going on in the tank during treatment. If you have a test kit or obtain one, please fill out this form to the beat of your ability. You already gave us lots of good information, but it helps me keep it straight to have it laid out in the format we are used to; where I can look quickly to find what I need. Test Results for the Following: * Ammonia Level(Tank) * Nitrite Level(Tank) * Nitrate level(Tank) * Ammonia Level(Tap) * Nitrite Level(Tap) * Nitrate level(Tap) * Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) * Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) Other Required Info: * Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? * Water temperature? * Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? * What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? * How often do you change the water and how much? * How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? * How many fish in the tank and their size? * What kind of water additives or conditioners? * What do you feed your fish and how often? * Any new fish added to the tank? * Any medications added to the tank? * List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment. * Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.? Depending on which country you are in, antibiotics may be trickier to obtain. Online sources have some shipping time issues but that’s probably your best bet. If you’re in the US it’s a bit simpler, but it is still likely you’ll need to order what we require for treatment, and so we will want to keep the fish as healthy as possible in the meantime.
    1 point
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